Files in this item

FilesDescriptionFormat

application/pdf

application/pdf8410033.pdf (4MB)Restricted to U of Illinois
(no description provided)PDF

Description

Title:English Language Use, Needs, and Proficiency Among Foreign Students at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Author(s):Robertson, Daniel Lee
Department / Program:Education
Discipline:Education
Degree Granting Institution:University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree:Ph.D.
Genre:Dissertation
Subject(s):Education, Tests and Measurements
Abstract:This research reveals the extent to which foreign students' reported use of English, their perceptions of the importance of English, and their proficiency in English are related to their membership in groups based on academic discipline, academic level, and teaching assistantship (TA) status.
The instruments used were a 72-item questionnaire and two interview schedules. The foreign student population at the UIUC (n = 1481) was surveyed using the mailed questionnaire, with a return rate of 57%. The interview schedules were administered by telephone to random samples of volunteers (n = 20) and non-respondents (n = 20) and to a selected sample (n = 20) of university faculty and staff.
Composite variables for use, importance, and ability were constructed from the questionnaire items, the reliability of the composites as scales was determined, and, using multiple linear regression analysis, each of the composites and the TOEFL score were regressed separately as dependent variables on the independent variables for academic discipline, academic level, and TA status, as well as on covariates related to total use, importance, or ability. In those regressions where significant main effects were observed, post-hoc comparisons of means were made. The interview data were summarized and reported for each sample.
Discipline was found to be significantly related to nine of the variables, level was found to be related to five, and TA status, five.
Differences in use of speaking and writing skills were observed across disciplines. Differences in use of speaking and listening skills were observed across levels. Differences in use of speaking skills were observed across TA status.
Differences in perceived importance of English language skills in general and of writing skills were observed across disciplines. No differences in importance were observed across levels or TA status.
Differences in perceived ability in listening and reading skills were observed across disciplines. Differences in reading skills were observed across levels. Differences in ability in speaking and listening skills were observed across TA status. TOEFL scores were also found to be higher among TAs.
Issue Date:1983
Type:Text
Description:133 p.
Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1983.
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/68916
Other Identifier(s):(UMI)AAI8410033
Date Available in IDEALS:2014-12-15
Date Deposited:1983


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Item Statistics