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Title:A Study of How Students Allocate Their Time in the Classroom (time-on-Task, Socio-Economic, Class Learning Activities)
Author(s):Herts, George Earl
Department / Program:Education
Discipline:Education
Degree Granting Institution:University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree:Educat.D.
Genre:Dissertation
Subject(s):Education, Administration
Abstract:Students are not passive recipients of educational services but play a decisive role in the production of their own learning. Students' time, as a non-purchased input, directly affects the efficacy of all other inputs used in the educational process. This study examined students' time-on-task (how students decide to use their time in the classroom was influenced by their home background and classroom learning activities).
Interviews with the students' parents were conducted in order to gather home background data. Observations in the classroom were conducted in order to gather information on student responses to various types of classroom learning activities. Numerous documents were reviewed for information to provide insight into conducting the study and minimizing methodological problems.
In this study the composite or aggregate analysis documents the strong association between a student's socio-economic status and time on task. But by adding grade level and group size to the data mix, the results were profoundly different. The patterns found in the results were erractic and illogical which suggested that another variable (teacher leadership and involvement), which had not been included in the study, had an important impact.
When examining classroom activities by group size, it became clear that the teacher influences students' time on task. When the teacher was uninvolved, students' background was important in determining time on task. When the teacher was involved, the background of students became significantly less in importance.
Issue Date:1984
Type:Text
Description:113 p.
Thesis (Educat.D.)--University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1984.
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/68953
Other Identifier(s):(UMI)AAI8502172
Date Available in IDEALS:2014-12-15
Date Deposited:1984


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