Files in this item

FilesDescriptionFormat

application/pdf

application/pdf8511605.pdf (4MB)Restricted to U of Illinois
(no description provided)PDF

Description

Title:The Relationship Between Problem Disclosure and Rate of Default Among Community College Students
Author(s):Evans, Charles Victor
Department / Program:Education
Discipline:Education
Degree Granting Institution:University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree:Ph.D.
Genre:Dissertation
Subject(s):Education, Educational Psychology
Abstract:This study explored the relationship between personal problem disclosure and default among community college students. A further examination was made considering the disclosing and defaulting behavior of the two largest categories of community college students: full-time, traditional age students and part-time adult students. Disclosure was defined as any personal information which an individual chooses to communicate to another person. Defaulting is the failure to complete a course or set of courses for which a student has enrolled. A questionnaire was designed and administered within a classroom setting to sample actual problem disclosure, awareness of related college assistance opportunities and past assistance attempts.
A significant positive relationship was found between problem disclosure and default for both full-time traditional and part-time adult students. The full-time traditional students consistently disclosed the presence of a greater number of problems when compared to the part-time adult students, but no difference was found between the groups in the type of problems disclosed. Problem disclosure was identified as a significant discriminator of default among part-time adult community college students.
Several implications were noted regarding the impact of past experiences and background characteristics on default. Since the amount of problem disclosure was found to vary between full-time traditional and part-time adult students, recommendations for both classroom instruction and student personnel practices were offered.
Issue Date:1985
Type:Text
Description:133 p.
Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1985.
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/68973
Other Identifier(s):(UMI)AAI8511605
Date Available in IDEALS:2014-12-15
Date Deposited:1985


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Item Statistics