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Title:Individualism: A Conception of Person
Author(s):Kashima, Yoshihisa
Department / Program:Psychology
Discipline:Psychology
Degree Granting Institution:University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree:Ph.D.
Genre:Dissertation
Subject(s):Psychology, Social
Abstract:A conceptual analysis identified the individualistic and collectivistic conceptions of person (ICP and CCP, respectively). The conceptions of person are lay theories of human beings. ICP regards an individual as the unit of action: CCP, a group as the unit of action. To clarify the conceptual definitions of ICP and CCP, the interrelation between ICP and CCP, and distinctions of ICP and CCP from the self-other orientation in personality were discussed. Empirically, ICP and CCP were independent of each other: Allocentrism that reflects the self-other orientation had a weak positive correlation with CCP, and a weak negative correlation with ICP. These suggested a conceptualization of individualism and collectivism as two orthogonal dimensions, rather than a bipolar dimension. Psychological functioning of ICP and CCP was investigated with regard to attributions and decision-making in a social dilemma. Specifically, high ICP people, compared to low ICP, had a weaker tendency to make trait attributions for both self and others, but a stronger tendency to attribute causes of events to the self. Further, in a social dilemma game, high ICP people contributed more to the group resource than low ICP people when the resource was well maintained. In contrast, high ICP people contributed less to the group resource than low ICP when the resource deteriorated. The effects of CCP were not strongly evidenced in relation to trait and causal attributions, and decision-making in a social dilemma. The paper discussed methodological, theoretical, and metatheoretical implications of ICP and CCP research.
Issue Date:1986
Type:Text
Description:114 p.
Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1986.
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/69669
Other Identifier(s):(UMI)AAI8610945
Date Available in IDEALS:2014-12-15
Date Deposited:1986


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