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Title:Community Response to Malaria: Muheza District, Tanzania, 1983-1984. A Study in Cultural Adaptation (Compliance, Prophylaxis, Women)
Author(s):Fivawo, Margaret
Department / Program:Anthropology
Discipline:Anthropology
Degree Granting Institution:University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree:Ph.D.
Genre:Dissertation
Subject(s):Anthropology, Cultural
Abstract:This study of a rural community in the malaria endemic area of Muheza in Tanzania deals with several issues. (1) Malaria as a health problem is looked at from its ecological epidemiological context. It is seen as a problem which has made it necessary for the resident people to develop knowledge and ways of dealing with it. This is the people's adaptation to a known hazardous environment. (2) The resident people are considered in a historical and cultural context including their early contact with outside cultures. Their closeness to the Indian Ocean made it possible for them to develop early contact with Islamic Arab culture and others that followed later. Missionary contact came early as well and was followed by other Europeans who started the development of sisal, tea and coffee plantations. As a result of this cultural contact, the resident peoples of Muheza developed new adaptive ways of managing malaria. Hence, today, a combination of methods are used to handle malaria and other diseases of the environment. (3) Even though Chloroquine and other Western medicines are popularly used, traditional medicines are also used in various combinations. Disease etiologies include parasites, djins and ancestors. This shows that traditional beliefs and values still strongly influence malaria management behavior even though other factors are also present. The institution of the African extended family, which is based on ancestor kinship linkage, has strong influence on malaria management behavior. (4) The Fishbein behavioral model and theory of reasoned action serve to point out and explain the underlying processes behind the pragmatic observed behavior regarding the use of chloroquine in the management of malaria. (5) Problems in the health services are pointed out and suggestions are made on the direction of change needed to achieve improved management of malaria and other diseases.
Issue Date:1985
Type:Text
Description:228 p.
Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1985.
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/70695
Other Identifier(s):(UMI)AAI8610924
Date Available in IDEALS:2014-12-16
Date Deposited:1985


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