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Title:The Self and Social Freedom: A Paradigm of Leisure (Interaction Theory, Self-Expression)
Author(s):Samdahl, Diane Marie
Department / Program:Leisure Studies
Discipline:Leisure Studies
Degree Granting Institution:University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree:Ph.D.
Genre:Dissertation
Subject(s):Sociology, General
Abstract:Leisure is characterized by perceived freedom from the constraining aspects of social role obligations. It is a distinctive relationship between the individual and the social milieu which allows a form of self-expression often inhibited in other social contexts. This view is strongly supported by theories of social interaction and the self; however, it is somewhat different than other current models of leisure. In order to evaluate this perspective, a study was designed to assess social role constraint and self-expression as experienced in everyday social contexts. Nineteen individuals were given electronic pagers for one week. At random times throughout the day they received a signal on the pager and completed a brief questionnaire to describe aspects of the immediate social context. Of the 769 responses, one third (36%) were described as leisure. LISREL analysis confirmed that freedom from social role constraint and freedom for self-expression were important concomitants of the leisure context. Without self-expression, freedom from role constraints was empty and anomic; however, with self-expression freedom from role constraints was pleasant and engaging. The importance of self-expression broadens our understanding of the freedom within leisure, and links leisure to an authenticity of experience qualitatively distinct from the "bad faith" of more common existence. Leisure offers a valuable opportunity for the holistic affirmation of oneself, and is an important realm of social experience.
Issue Date:1986
Type:Text
Description:210 p.
Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1986.
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/70943
Other Identifier(s):(UMI)AAI8623401
Date Available in IDEALS:2014-12-16
Date Deposited:1986


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