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Title:The Influence of Pore Fluid on The Stability of a Rock Mass With a Weakened Zone
Author(s):Bowers, Glenn Lee
Department / Program:Theoretical and Applied Mechanics
Discipline:Theoretical and Applied Mechanics
Degree Granting Institution:University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree:Ph.D.
Genre:Dissertation
Subject(s):Applied Mechanics
Abstract:The influence of the competing effects of dilatant hardening and diffusive softening on the stability of saturated rock is investigated. The analysis considers an infinite slab of fluid-infiltrated rock which contains a sublayer of weakened material. Inelastic deformation is allowed throughout the slab, with strain softening possible. The boundaries are loaded in plane strain by a uniform, constant compressive stress and a constant tangential displacement rate. The results of both a perturbation analysis and several numerical examples indicate that the deformation will localize in the sublayer at the interfaces. It is also found that the accelerating strain induces an increase in the influence of diffusion in the interface region, with the net effect being that the zone in which the deformation localizes is driven towards drained conditions. The numerical results suggest that ultimately, failure will instantaneously occur when the hardening modulus at the weakest point reaches the same value at which the dry response of the slab would become unstable. For the parameters chosen for the numerical examples, large scale inelastic dilation in the stronger rock was possible, and this dilatancy was found to increase the ultimate strength and final failure time beyond the values at which the dry rock would fail. However, under in situ conditions at tectonic strain rates, the numerical analysis suggests that the presence of a pore fluid will have little influence on earth faulting.
Issue Date:1982
Type:Text
Description:117 p.
Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1982.
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/71669
Other Identifier(s):(UMI)AAI8302813
Date Available in IDEALS:2014-12-16
Date Deposited:1982


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