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Title:Assessment of Blood Flow in the Human Calf During Maximal Intermittent Dynamic Exercise Utilizing Impedance Plethysmography
Author(s):Demeter, Robert Joseph
Department / Program:Physical Education
Discipline:Physical Education
Degree Granting Institution:University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree:Ph.D.
Genre:Dissertation
Subject(s):Biology, Animal Physiology
Abstract:Twenty college-age males (10 trained runners and ten untrained) were studied under rest, maximal intermittent dynamic calf exercise and recovery conditions to determine differences in calf blood flow, peripheral pulse rate, calf blood volume/beat, cardiac output, cardiac index, heart rate and stroke volume. During rest significant differences (p (LESSTHEQ) .05) between groups were found for peripheral pulse rate, cardiac output, heart rate and stroke volume. During exercise a significant difference between groups was found for peripheral pulse rate. During the first 60 seconds of recovery (recovery 1) significant differences between groups were found for calf blood flow (ml/100 ml tissue/min), peripheral pulse rate, and heart rate. During the last 9 minutes of recovery (recovery 2) significant differences between groups were found for peripheral pulse rate, cardiac output, cardiac index, and heart rate. These results demonstrate that during these type of intermittent exercises calf blood flow (ml/min) is reduced below resting values approximately 61% and 63% for trained and untrained groups, respectively. It is concluded that through the use of impedance cardiography (plethysmography) and the protocols utilized that: (1) differences between groups can be found relative to peripheral pulse rate, cardiac output, heart rate and stroke volume during rest; (2) differences can be found relative to peripheral pulse rate during intermittent exercise; (3) differences can be found relative to calf blood flow (ml/100 ml tissue/min), peripheral pulse rate and heart rate during the first 60 seconds of recovery and; (4) differences can be found relative to peripheral pulse rate, cardiac output, cardiac index and heart rate during the last 9 minutes of recovery.
Issue Date:1983
Type:Text
Description:349 p.
Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1983.
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/71866
Other Identifier(s):(UMI)AAI8409907
Date Available in IDEALS:2014-12-16
Date Deposited:1983


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