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Title:Ferroelectric/piezoelectric flexible mechanical energy harvesters and stretchable epidermal sensors for medical applications
Author(s):Dagdeviren, Canan
Director of Research:Rogers, John A.
Doctoral Committee Chair(s):Rogers, John A.
Doctoral Committee Member(s):Braun, Paul V.; Martin, Lane W.; Ferreira, Placid M.
Department / Program:Materials Science & Engineerng
Discipline:Materials Science & Engr
Degree Granting Institution:University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree:Ph.D.
Genre:Dissertation
Subject(s):piezoelectricity
Ferroelectricity
conformal electronics
flexible electronics
stretchale electronics
unusual electronics
sensors
actuators
mechanical energy harvesters
implantable medical devices
Abstract:Multifunctional sensing capability, ‘unusual’ formats with flexible/stretchable designs, rugged lightweight construction, and self-powered operation are desired attributes for electronics that directly interface with the human body. The collective results in this dissertation suggest utility in a variety of sensors and energy harvesting components, with lightweight construction, attractive mechanical properties and potential for implementation over large areas, with promising application in unusual bio-integrated electronics, such as self-powered cardiac pacemakers, skin-mounted blood pressure sensors, modulus sensors and skin cancer detection bio-patches. For these and related applications, unusual electronics provide the capability of intimate and conformal integration with a variety of substrates on biological tissues. These systems can be twisted, folded, stretched/flexed and wrapped onto curviliniar surfaces without damage or significant alteration in operation. In this dissertation, the application of ferroelectric/piezoelectric materials and patterning techniques for ‘unusual’ electronics, with an emphasis on bio-integrated systems were demonstrated. Overall, the results suggest that the various sensor capabilities could be valuable for a range of applications in continuous self-powered health/wellness monitoring and clinical medicine.
Issue Date:2015-01-21
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/73068
Rights Information:Copyright 2014 Canan Dagdeviren
Date Available in IDEALS:2015-01-21
Date Deposited:2014-12


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