Browse Diversity on Campus/Equity and Access by Series/Report

    Series/Report
    A desired outcome of the course was that engagement with both theory and research practice of issues concerning youth, Asian American youth in particular. This course was aimed to allow students to gain a fuller understanding of race, class, culture, diversity, and gender in U.S society, through the research on Asian American youth. Moreover, in conducting research related to Asian American youth on campus such as student organizations, sororities or fraternities, student housing life, religious life, and cultural houses, the course provided students with the opportunity to closely examine issues of student racial diversity at the University of Illinois. Also as part of the EUI project, students critically examined an institution that is closest to their daily experience: their university. As such, students investigated the role of the university in student life and different purposes and outcomes of college education. [4]
    AAS 199 Undergraduate Open Seminar: Discovery Course [4]
    AAS 258 Muslims in America [6]
    AAS 258, Fall 2011 [9]
    AAS 258; Fall 2011 [1]
    AAS 346, Asian American Youth, Prof. Soo Ah Kwon: This course explores the ways that second-generation Asian and Pacific Islander (API) youth are actively shaping the U.S. landscape in terms of identity formation, youth cultural production, education, organizing, and community formations. These experiences are examined within larger historical, economic, racial, social and political forces in the United States. Rather than approach the study of youth through a developmental psychological model of adolescence, this course will examine youth as a culturally specific social formation. We will engage with texts that draw from different academic disciplines to provide us with theoretical, historical, and ethnographic perspectives of young people. We will also compare and situate the unique (and not so unique) experiences of API youth with young people of different racial and ethnic backgrounds. The course syllabus is available at: www.eui.uiuc.edu/docs/syllabi/AAS346F07.doc [13]
    AAS 346; Fall 2010 [3]
    AAS(LLS)258 Muslims in America [1]
    AAS258 Muslims in America [3]
    AAS258 Spring 2011 Muslims in America [13]
    AAS346 Section A (Asian American Youth) [4]
    ANTH 411: Methods for Sociocultural Anthropology, Prof. Nancy Abelmann. This course introduced students to a variety of ethnographic methods. Students tried their hand at some of these methods through a focused project. I had students think about their semester-long work as "pilot research"; although they did write up a short paper on their findings (their "discuss" section of the database), the culminating assignment was a research proposal in which they envision building on their preliminary findings in a longer/larger project. In the beginning of the semester, students did some warm-up exercises not directly related to their projects (an observation, an analysis of a university document, and an interview) -- some students elected to remove these from their databases while others left them in because of their connection to the final project. Students' "question" and "plan" sections of the database include multiple entries as I encouraged them to continue to refine these over the course of the semester in dialogue with their own emerging findings. I also asked students to search both the U of I Student Life and Cultures Archives and well as this EUI IDEALS collection to find archives relevant to their pilot/proposed research. All students were asked to "reflect" on the research experience and to make "recommendations" to the University on the basis of their research findings. The course syllabus is available at: www.eui.uiuc.edu/docs/syllabi/ANTH411F07.doc [18]
    ANTH 411; Fall 2010 [16]
    ANTH 497 [1]
    Anth 499, East Asian Youth and Global Futures, Prof. Nancy Abelmann and Prof. Karen Kelsky: East Asian youth have experienced perhaps the world’s most compressed development as well as the world’s most aggressive globalization policies. This course examines how youth in East Asia (China/s, Japan, and the Koreas) are making their way in our globalizing world, focusing in particular on the transformations in work, education, recreation, gender, and sexuality brought about by neoliberal economic restructuring in the region. Topics studied include the insecure job market for young people, consumerism, globalized pop culture phenomena such as Pokemon, the Korean wave, and Internet gaming, emergent LGBT communities, etc. Students are encouraged to focus their research projects on aspects of the U. of I. student life that reflect the experiences of East Asian youth in a global market. The U of I offers a fascinating window on East Asian youth because of the many college (and pre-college) students who make their way here – as well as the movement of “Amercian” youth to East Asia. Through participation in the Ethnography of the University Initiative (EUI), students will conduct local field research that reveals the global processes at issue. The course syllabus is available at: www.eui.uiuc.edu/docs/syllabi/ANTH499S08.doc [14]
    ANTH499 Section NA (Ethnography of East Asia) [1]
    As part of the Ethnographic University Initiative, we will work together to establish a collegial research community in the class. Thus, as you develop your independent research projects we all will have opportunities to give and receive feedback throughout the semester. My hope is that you will strengthen your understanding of the research process and your self-efficacy as researchers. By effectively investigating some aspect of whiteness at the University of Illinois, we will contribute in meaningful ways to understanding how whiteness operates in one of the contexts in which we live. [13]
    Asian American youth make up one of the fastest growing populations in the United States. In this course we explored the ways that second-generation Asian American youth are actively shaping the U.S. landscape in terms of identity formation, youth culture, education, and activism. These experiences are examined within larger historical, economic, racial, social and political forces in the United States. [3]
    Asian American youth make up one of the fastest growing populations in the United States. In this course we will explore the ways that second-generation Asian American youth are actively shaping the U.S. landscape in terms of identity formation, youth culture, education, and activism. These experiences will be examined within larger historical, economic, racial, social and political forces in the United States. In addition to an engagement of texts from different academic disciplines to provide us with theoretical perspectives of young people, this course will provide students with first hand research experience as part of The Ethnography of the University Initiative (EUI) by engaging students in the research process and meaningfully interrogate the U of I. A desired outcome of the course is that engagement with both theory and research practice of issues concerning youth, and Asian American youth in particular, will allow students to gain a fuller understanding of race, class, culture, diversity, and gender in U.S society. Moreover, in conducting research related to Asian American youth on campus such as student organizations, sororities or fraternities, student housing life, religious life, and cultural houses, the course will provide students with the opportunity to closely examine issues of student racial diversity at the University of Illinois. [4]
    Asian and Pacific Islander (API) youth make up one of the fastest growing populations in the United States. According to the 2000 census, approximately 90% of the API population are either foreign born or are second-generation with immigrant parents. A large portion of this population are the 1.5 and second-generation who have come of age in the 21st century in the post 1965 immigration era. These API youth represent an extremely heterogeneous population including Cambodian, Chinese, Hawaiian, Filipino, Japanese, Indian, Korean, Laotian, Mien, Samoan, Thai, Tongan, and mixed race youth. In this course, students explored the ways that second-generation youth are actively shaping the U.S. landscape in terms of identity formation, youth culture, and education. These experiences were examined within larger historical, economic, racial, social and political forces in the United States. Students also compared and situated the unique (and not so unique) experiences of API youth with young people of different racial and ethnic backgrounds. [4]