Browse Globalization and the University by Series/Report

    Series/Report
    EALC 365 Spring 2012 Contemporary Korean Society [2]
    EALC 398; Fall 2012 [5]
    Ellen Moodie, Instructor [1]
    ENGL401 Spring 2011: Introduction to the Story of the English Language [1]
    EOL580 Section 1 (Critical Issues in Higher Education) -- Timothy Reese Cain [1]
    History 396; Fall 2012 [3]
    In this course we explore important issues in the study of Contemporary Korean Society and ask how those themes can help us to better understand processes of globalization in East Asia and beyond. Although the Koreas are relatively small countries in Asia, as Michael Robinson writes, “They have played a disproportionately important role in the last hundred years of world history” (2007:1). Their history of colonialism, the Korean War, coming of age in the Cold War, and struggling to rise to the top of the global stage makes them a productive region of the world for thinking about themes such as globalization, nationalism, belonging and modernity. In the first half of the course we look at Korea’s global roots and see how North and South Korea have diverged in their struggle to modernize. In the second half of the course we focus on South Korea’s efforts to define its national identity, and in doing so, have caused many exceptional cases to emerge. We look at issues such as the Korean diaspora, immigration, plastic surgery, and how even as the desire for an English-language education forces South Koreans to travel abroad, the ‘Korean Wave’ of film, TV and music is hitting the shores of most countries in Asia (and worldwide) and has made Korea an enviable producer of global cultural products. We pair ethnographies, historical texts and anthropological articles focused on Korea with key texts in the anthropology of globalization. Additionally we use both documentary and feature film to analyze class themes. [2]
    Instructor, Caitlin Vitosky [2]
    Instructor, Erica Vogel [2]
    Instructor, Nancy Abelmann [5]
    Introduction to the study of Muslims in the United States and broadly the history of Islam in the Americas. Using a comparative approach, we study how the historical narrative of African American and Latino Muslims relates to newer immigrant populations, primarily Arab American and South Asian American Muslim communities. [2]
    KIN 249; Spring 2012 [2]
    Life writing encompasses many genres (diary, memoir, biography, chronicle, confessional poetry) and media (print, web text, video). This class will explore life story research: a qualitative method of inquiry that involves gathering narratives about life experience in order to expand knowledge of a particular social or cultural subject. As an advanced composition course, Rhet 233 includes advanced writing and research activities, such as anticipating audience, exploring stylistic choices, synthesizing and responding to material from multiple sources, planning and shaping a draft, receiving and incorporating feedback, revising, and editing. [1]
    Mireya Loza, Instructor [3]
    Prof. Junaid Rana [2]
    Professor Catherine Viera [1]
    Professor Junaid Rana [2]
    Professor Lauren Marshall Bowen [1]
    Rhet 104, Ethnography of Race and the University, Instr. Samantha Looker: In this course, students take the writing skills that they built during Rhet 103 and apply them to research, with the ultimate goal of completing an in-depth research project. As part of the EUI-Rhetoric Race and the University Project, this class revolves around how race is represented and lived on university campuses, and specifically on our own campus here at UIUC. Students ground themselves in readings on how race is defined and talked about, and then move on to research related issues on our campus. Students will choose a research question related to race to answer in your final research project. As part of the EUI (Ethnography of the University Initiative), this class gives students the opportunity to create original scholarly research based on your firsthand experience with people, texts, and places on campus. In addition to traditional academic sources, students final research project will include several interviews, observations, surveys, and/or analyses of University texts. [1]
    RHET233 Writing a Life [1]