Browse Student Communities and Culture by Series/Report

    Series/Report
    Cody Caudill, Instructor [4]
    COMM 396, Folklore as Communication, Prof. Susan Davis: This section of Communication 396 focuses on the study of unofficial and homemade communication and culture, sometimes called "folklore". This unofficial communication includes speech, stories, proverbs, rituals and performances. This semester we will be participating in the Ethnography of the University of Illinois initiative (EUI), documenting the unofficial culture of students at U of I. We will also be developing proposals and methods for an ethnographic case study of student perceptions and experiences of "Unofficial St. Patrick's Day." In this course you can expect to do a good deal of reading on folklore in general and student culture in particular. You will also be asked to practice a variety of cultural description and documentation skills. You can expect to come away from the course with a strong sense of variety, persistence and flexibility of traditional culture as it lives in the present, and a good deal of practice in recording it, writing about it, and analyzing it. The course syllabus is available at: http://www.eui.uiuc.edu/docs/syllabi/COMM396F08.pdf. [2]
    Deanna Williams, Instructor [8]
    EALC 365 Spring 2012 Contemporary Korean Society [2]
    EALC 398; Fall 2012 [6]
    Eileen Lagman [2]
    Ellen Moodie, Instructor [16]
    ENGL 506 Writing Studies II, Prof. Cathy Prendergast: This course explored literacy and race: as mutually constituting concepts, as “problems” national discourse and scholarship alike seek to address, as markers of identity. Students jointly examined how relationships between race and literacy had been historically constructed. Of particular interest was how race is constructed as a category in and through research on literacy; in the scope of our reading students encountered the epistemological assumptions, methodological scrambling, and critical/political allegiances that had created the intertwining histories of literacy and race. The purpose of this course was explicitly to prepare students to do graduate level qualitative research. Assignments introduced students to forms of archival and ethnographic methods. Discussion of texts centered on methodology as much as content. Students were asked to comment frequently on the work of others in the course. [3]
    ENGL401 Spring 2011: Introduction to the Story of the English Language [17]
    ENGL401 Spring 2011: Introduction to the Study of the English Language [1]
    English 199/CHP; Spring 2012 [6]
    EOL 574, Lorenzo Baber, Instructor, Spring 2013 [11]
    EPS 500, Race and Ethnography: A Study of the University, Prof. Priscilla Fortier: This seminar is not only a course, but part of a cross-campus initiative titled Ethnography of the University Initiative. As a member of this course students joined a campus-wide learning community in which the University of Illinois was explored ethnographically. Students began the course by thinking about what the university is, as well as about race and ethnicity as phenomena within the university’s narratives. Students learned about universities and higher education in general and the University of Illinois in particular. A third area of concentration was “ethnography,” and students learned and practiced the basic skills of observation, interviewing, and writing as an ethnographer. Students completed several short assignments that were intended to help them develop these skills, as well as one larger ethnographic project on the University. The latter allowed them to explore an aspect of the university that has to do with an issue of race or ethnicity. In addition to the readings that students did as a class, they were expected to explore other research related to their project. The course syllabus is available at: http://www.eui.uiuc.edu/docs/syllabi/EPS500F08.pdf. [7]
    EPS 500pf1: Race and Ethnography: A Study of the University, Prof. Priscilla Fortier. As a member of this course students join a campus-wide learning community in which the University of Illinois is being explored ethnographically. Students begin the course by thinking about what the university is, as well as about race and ethnicity as phenomena within the university's narratives. One area of concentration will be "ethnography," and students learn and practice the basic skills of observation, interviewing, and writing as an ethnographer. They complete several relatively short assignments that are intended to help them develop these skills, as well as one larger ethnographic project on the University. The latter allows students to explore an aspect of the university that has to do with as issue of race or ethnicity. The course syllabus is available at: www.eui.uiuc.edu/docs/syllabi/EPS500F07.doc [5]
    Fall 2012; History 396B Oral History; Mireya Loza, Instructor [1]
    Fall 2012; Rhetoric 105; Linda Larsen, Instructor [2]
    GWS 467/HIST 396 Locating Queer Culture Spring 2012 [9]
    GWS 495 Researching Queer Culture [5]
    HIST 200G: Audiohistory (Coming to Illinois) [1]
    History 396; Fall 2011 [1]