Browse Student Communities and Culture by Series/Report

    Series/Report
    Our goal for this course was to create original research projects about queer culture, with a special focus on our local context, the University of Illinois, in relation to the surrounding Urbana-Champaign area. Our guiding questions included: What are the various ways of defining “queer”? What counts as “culture”? Where do we find queer culture? How is queer culture produced, sustained, or transformed? How do institutions (such as universities) help to produce or erase queer culture? What roles do race, class, and/or gender play in the production and/or visibility of queer culture? Our course texts included selected examples of queer cultural production, including film, novels, television, magazines, and music. Assignments were designed around two research projects: (1) an archival research project on some aspect of local queer history and (2) an ethnographic research project on some aspect of contemporary local queer culture. [9]
    Our goal for this course was to learn different methods for researching “queer culture,” with a special focus on our local context at UIUC. Our guiding questions included: What are the various ways of defining “queer”? What counts as “culture”? Where do we find queer culture? How is queer culture produced, sustained, or transformed? How do institutions (such as universities) help to produce or erase queer culture? What roles do race, class, and/or gender play in the production and/or visibility of queer culture? We explored two research methods in depth: history and ethnography. One of the most exciting aspects of this course was that students produced their own original research based on genuine gaps in existing knowledge. By the end of the course, students not only had become familiar with the main currents in existing scholarship on queer culture, but also had produced their own new archival histories and ethnographic accounts of queer culture at UIUC. A special feature of this course was its connection to the Ethnography of the University Initiative. By taking the course, students also participated in a campus-wide research project about the university itself. More information about EUI is available at www.eui.uiuc.edu/index.html. [5]
    Parkland Community College; English 106; Spring 2011 [6]
    Prof. Anne Sautman [6]
    Prof. Eileen Lagman [4]
    Prof. Junaid Rana [10]
    Prof. Kristin McCann [6]
    Prof. Ligia Mihut [5]
    Prof. Siobhan Somerville [5]
    Prof. Soo Ah Kwon [4]
    Professor Catherine Vieira [2]
    Professor Catherine Viera [16]
    Professor John Randolph [2]
    Professor Junaid Rana [13]
    Professor Lauren Marshall Bowen [2]
    Professor Linda Larsen [6]
    Professor Soo Ah Kwon [4]
    Professor Thomas Herakovich [13]
    Rhet 102, College Writing II, B1 (Prof. Elaine Wood):This course engaged issues of race, diversity and representation at the university. Its aim was for students to learn basic techniques for critically engaging with academic texts, structuring argumentative essays, and critiquing their own work. This was expected to be achieved by a series of writing assignments, which prepared students to look at various aspects of campus culture with a critical eye. From these assignments students developed a larger research project that brought them into conversation with their environment and other scholars, and the research of previous students. [2]
    Rhet 102: Race and the University, Instr. Eve Eure: This course engages issues of race, diversity and representation at the University of Illinois. Students are encouraged to think about what the university is, as well as about race and ethnicity as a phenomena within the university’s narratives. The readings in the course interrogate U.S. race politics as a way to contextualize our understanding of the relationship between race and the University of Illinois. Students write both long and short essays which critically analyze the readings done both inside and outside of the classroom. This is achieved by a series of writing assignments, which prepare students to look at these various aspects of campus culture which might not otherwise be questioned and/or studied in a critical manner. Students build upon these initial studies to create a larger research project that brings them into conversation with their environment and other scholars, as well as research of previous students. The course syllabus is available at: www.eui.uiuc.edu/docs/syllabi/RHET102S08.doc [3]