Browse Student Learning by Series/Report

    Series/Report
    AAS 258 Muslims in America [6]
    AAS 258, Fall 2011 [9]
    AAS 346, Asian American Youth, Prof. Soo Ah Kwon: This course explores the ways that second-generation Asian and Pacific Islander (API) youth are actively shaping the U.S. landscape in terms of identity formation, youth cultural production, education, organizing, and community formations. These experiences are examined within larger historical, economic, racial, social and political forces in the United States. Rather than approach the study of youth through a developmental psychological model of adolescence, this course will examine youth as a culturally specific social formation. We will engage with texts that draw from different academic disciplines to provide us with theoretical, historical, and ethnographic perspectives of young people. We will also compare and situate the unique (and not so unique) experiences of API youth with young people of different racial and ethnic backgrounds. The course syllabus is available at: www.eui.uiuc.edu/docs/syllabi/AAS346F07.doc [13]
    AAS 346; Fall 2011 [4]
    AAS258 Spring 2011 Muslims in America [13]
    ANTH 411: Methods for Sociocultural Anthropology, Prof. Nancy Abelmann. This course introduced students to a variety of ethnographic methods. Students tried their hand at some of these methods through a focused project. I had students think about their semester-long work as "pilot research"; although they did write up a short paper on their findings (their "discuss" section of the database), the culminating assignment was a research proposal in which they envision building on their preliminary findings in a longer/larger project. In the beginning of the semester, students did some warm-up exercises not directly related to their projects (an observation, an analysis of a university document, and an interview) -- some students elected to remove these from their databases while others left them in because of their connection to the final project. Students' "question" and "plan" sections of the database include multiple entries as I encouraged them to continue to refine these over the course of the semester in dialogue with their own emerging findings. I also asked students to search both the U of I Student Life and Cultures Archives and well as this EUI IDEALS collection to find archives relevant to their pilot/proposed research. All students were asked to "reflect" on the research experience and to make "recommendations" to the University on the basis of their research findings. The course syllabus is available at: www.eui.uiuc.edu/docs/syllabi/ANTH411F07.doc [18]
    ANTH 411; Fall 2010 [16]
    Anth 499, East Asian Youth and Global Futures, Prof. Nancy Abelmann and Prof. Karen Kelsky: East Asian youth have experienced perhaps the world’s most compressed development as well as the world’s most aggressive globalization policies. This course examines how youth in East Asia (China/s, Japan, and the Koreas) are making their way in our globalizing world, focusing in particular on the transformations in work, education, recreation, gender, and sexuality brought about by neoliberal economic restructuring in the region. Topics studied include the insecure job market for young people, consumerism, globalized pop culture phenomena such as Pokemon, the Korean wave, and Internet gaming, emergent LGBT communities, etc. Students are encouraged to focus their research projects on aspects of the U. of I. student life that reflect the experiences of East Asian youth in a global market. The U of I offers a fascinating window on East Asian youth because of the many college (and pre-college) students who make their way here – as well as the movement of “Amercian” youth to East Asia. Through participation in the Ethnography of the University Initiative (EUI), students will conduct local field research that reveals the global processes at issue. The course syllabus is available at: www.eui.uiuc.edu/docs/syllabi/ANTH499S08.doc [14]
    Art - Studio 299, Museums in Action: Engaging the Community, Elizabeth Delacruz and Anne Sautman: This course considered how museum audience development perspectives and research are translated into practices that meet the needs and interests of culturally diverse audiences. Course readings, writing assignments, research, inquiry activities, and presentations provided students with opportunities for examination of museum interpretive practices, programming decisions, and public engagement activities, as well as analysis of Krannert Art Museum’s presence on the university campus, in the larger community, and on the World Wide Web. Students developed innovative museum educational approaches that would increase the accessibility of the artwork in Krannert Art Museum to culturally diverse audiences. Student research and development involved study of the museum’s multicultural permanent collection and temporary exhibitions; studies of local audiences; and studies of educational programming, and museum curricular materials. Students also explored how new media technologies can be incorporated into museum educational practices by developing new practices. The course syllabus is available at: http://www.eui.uiuc.edu/docs/syllabi/ARTS299F08.pdf. [6]
    ARTS 299 Spec Topics in Studio Art: Museums in Action: Engaging the Community [10]
    Cody Caudill, Instructor [4]
    Ellen Moodie, Instructor [16]
    ENGL 506 Writing Studies II, Prof. Cathy Prendergast: This course explored literacy and race: as mutually constituting concepts, as “problems” national discourse and scholarship alike seek to address, as markers of identity. Students jointly examined how relationships between race and literacy had been historically constructed. Of particular interest was how race is constructed as a category in and through research on literacy; in the scope of our reading students encountered the epistemological assumptions, methodological scrambling, and critical/political allegiances that had created the intertwining histories of literacy and race. The purpose of this course was explicitly to prepare students to do graduate level qualitative research. Assignments introduced students to forms of archival and ethnographic methods. Discussion of texts centered on methodology as much as content. Students were asked to comment frequently on the work of others in the course. [3]
    ENGL401 Spring 2011: Introduction to the Story of the English Language [17]
    English/CHP 199; Spring 2012 [1]
    EOL580 Section 1 (Critical Issues in Higher Education) -- Timothy Reese Cain [2]
    EPS 500, Race and Ethnography: A Study of the University, Prof. Priscilla Fortier: This seminar is not only a course, but part of a cross-campus initiative titled Ethnography of the University Initiative. As a member of this course students joined a campus-wide learning community in which the University of Illinois was explored ethnographically. Students began the course by thinking about what the university is, as well as about race and ethnicity as phenomena within the university’s narratives. Students learned about universities and higher education in general and the University of Illinois in particular. A third area of concentration was “ethnography,” and students learned and practiced the basic skills of observation, interviewing, and writing as an ethnographer. Students completed several short assignments that were intended to help them develop these skills, as well as one larger ethnographic project on the University. The latter allowed them to explore an aspect of the university that has to do with an issue of race or ethnicity. In addition to the readings that students did as a class, they were expected to explore other research related to their project. The course syllabus is available at: http://www.eui.uiuc.edu/docs/syllabi/EPS500F08.pdf. [7]
    First, we strived as a class to meet the course goals. Second, we tried to reach those goals through a number of intertwined and foundational concepts including - thinking like the writers we are, creating a writing workshop environment (see the terms "Meta" and "Dialogic" and “Talking Stick”), nurturing a learned and healthy form of mental suspicion (critical thinking) leading to an awareness of "Rhetorical Situations," and eventually, creating a "dialogic" and "meta"-classroom environment. [6]
    In Rhetoric 105 students were expected to:1. develop skills as readers and writers by reading and writing sophisticated prose; 2. experience writing as a process of revision, where longer, more complex pieces grow out of earlier work; 3. reflect on their processes as readers and writers as they read, write about, and discuss the texts of the course: published work, peers’ writing, as well as their own; 4. become more practiced at using writing as a means of investigation, of figuring things out, thus challenging the commonplace belief that all writing is designed to prove something once and for all; 5. identify and connect the intellectual and philosophical insights that arise when reading and writing personal and ethnographic essays, to the contexts of our day to day lives; 6. accomplish 1-5 above within a course context dedicated to theorizing and practicing the art of the personal, ethnograpfic, and academic essay. [6]
    In this Rhetoric 105 class students were expected to: 1. develop skills as readers and writers by reading and writing sophisticated prose, including ethnographic papers/books/articles and research papers/journals/books/articles; 2. experience writing as a process of revision and collaboration, where longer, more complex pieces grow out of earlier work—ideas, collaboration, field notes, summaries, abstracts, data tables, charts, and graphs; 3. reflect and analyze conventional and personal reading and writing processes as readers and writers while reading, writing about, and discussing the texts of the course: published work, peers’ work, as well as personal work; 4. become more practiced at using writing as a means of investigation, writing as an early strategy for discovering and for answering questions, thus challenging the commonplace belief that all writing is designed to prove something once and for all; 5. identify and connect the intellectual and philosophical insights that arise when reading and writing personal and ethnographic essays, to the contexts of our day to day lives; 6. accomplish 1-5 above within a course context dedicated to investigating Race and Ethnicity here at UIUC and elsewhere through theorizing and practicing the art of writing and critiquing personal, ethnographic, academic papers, and various forms of data presentation. [13]