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    Series/Report
    In Rhetoric 105 students were expected to:1. develop skills as readers and writers by reading and writing sophisticated prose; 2. experience writing as a process of revision, where longer, more complex pieces grow out of earlier work; 3. reflect on their processes as readers and writers as they read, write about, and discuss the texts of the course: published work, peers’ writing, as well as their own; 4. become more practiced at using writing as a means of investigation, of figuring things out, thus challenging the commonplace belief that all writing is designed to prove something once and for all; 5. identify and connect the intellectual and philosophical insights that arise when reading and writing personal and ethnographic essays, to the contexts of our day to day lives; 6. accomplish 1-5 above within a course context dedicated to theorizing and practicing the art of the personal, ethnograpfic, and academic essay. [6]
    In this Rhetoric 105 class students were expected to: 1. develop skills as readers and writers by reading and writing sophisticated prose, including ethnographic papers/books/articles and research papers/journals/books/articles; 2. experience writing as a process of revision and collaboration, where longer, more complex pieces grow out of earlier work—ideas, collaboration, field notes, summaries, abstracts, data tables, charts, and graphs; 3. reflect and analyze conventional and personal reading and writing processes as readers and writers while reading, writing about, and discussing the texts of the course: published work, peers’ work, as well as personal work; 4. become more practiced at using writing as a means of investigation, writing as an early strategy for discovering and for answering questions, thus challenging the commonplace belief that all writing is designed to prove something once and for all; 5. identify and connect the intellectual and philosophical insights that arise when reading and writing personal and ethnographic essays, to the contexts of our day to day lives; 6. accomplish 1-5 above within a course context dedicated to investigating Race and Ethnicity here at UIUC and elsewhere through theorizing and practicing the art of writing and critiquing personal, ethnographic, academic papers, and various forms of data presentation. [13]
    Instructor, Catherine Prendergast [7]
    Instructor, Cody Caudill [9]
    Instructor, Melissa Littlefield [7]
    Introduction to the study of Muslims in the United States and broadly the history of Islam in the Americas. Using a comparative approach, we study how the historical narrative of African American and Latino Muslims relates to newer immigrant populations, primarily Arab American and South Asian American Muslim communities. [13]
    It is important to remember that “The Ethnography of the University” is not only a course but also part of two larger projects, the “Imagining America Project,” a national project combining the arts, humanities and social sciences to create interdisciplinary discussions about America’s future http://www.imaginingamerica.org/ , and the University of Illinois centered project, the Ethnography of the University Initiative (EUI) http://www.eui.uiuc.edu/. [5]
    It is important to remember that “The Ethnography of the University” is not only a course but also part of two larger projects, the “Imagining America Project,” a national project combining the arts, humanities and social sciences to create interdisciplinary discussions about America’s future http://www.imaginingamerica.org/ , and the University of Illinois centered project, the Ethnography of the University Initiative (EUI) http://www.eui.uiuc.edu/. The Ethnography of the University Initiative (EUI) includes several universities and community colleges located in the state of Illinois. All of these schools are public. Syracuse University is the first non-Illinois and first private university to join the group. This class joined an inter-campus learning community in which many classes from several schools (most, however, are located at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign) explore their universities and colleges ethnographically. In order to explore Syracuse University ethnographically, we needed to think about what “the university” is, what “ethnography” is, and what “scholarship in action” is. Broadly, we explored the university as a composite of prose, numerical, and visual narratives. [1]
    Junaid Rana, Instructor [10]
    Kinesiology 442 Fall 2011 [7]
    Prof. Anne Sautman [6]
    Prof. Junaid Rana [10]
    Prof. Kristin McCann [6]
    Professor Catherine Viera [16]
    Professor Junaid Rana [13]
    Professor Thomas Herakovich [13]
    Rhet 102: Race and the University, Instr. Eve Eure: This course engages issues of race, diversity and representation at the University of Illinois. Students are encouraged to think about what the university is, as well as about race and ethnicity as a phenomena within the university’s narratives. The readings in the course interrogate U.S. race politics as a way to contextualize our understanding of the relationship between race and the University of Illinois. Students write both long and short essays which critically analyze the readings done both inside and outside of the classroom. This is achieved by a series of writing assignments, which prepare students to look at these various aspects of campus culture which might not otherwise be questioned and/or studied in a critical manner. Students build upon these initial studies to create a larger research project that brings them into conversation with their environment and other scholars, as well as research of previous students. The course syllabus is available at: www.eui.uiuc.edu/docs/syllabi/RHET102S08.doc [3]
    Rhet 104, Ethnography of Race and the University, Instr. Samantha Looker: In this course, students take the writing skills that they built during Rhet 103 and apply them to research, with the ultimate goal of completing an in-depth research project. As part of the EUI-Rhetoric Race and the University Project, this class revolves around how race is represented and lived on university campuses, and specifically on our own campus here at UIUC. Students ground themselves in readings on how race is defined and talked about, and then move on to research related issues on our campus. Students will choose a research question related to race to answer in your final research project. As part of the EUI (Ethnography of the University Initiative), this class gives students the opportunity to create original scholarly research based on your firsthand experience with people, texts, and places on campus. In addition to traditional academic sources, students final research project will include several interviews, observations, surveys, and/or analyses of University texts. [7]
    RHET 105, Spring 2012 [9]
    RHET105 Fall 2011: Principles of Composition [8]