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    The course also introduced students to ethnographic methods. The bulk of this class was devoted to students’ own ethnographic projects on a Syracuse University “Scholarship in Action” endeavor although it was possible to carry out research on other areas if students presented a good case for doing so. A wide variety of social practices and learning processes were expected to become part of what students researched. [1]
    The Ethnography of the University Initiative (EUI) includes several universities and community colleges located in the state of Illinois. All of these schools are public. Syracuse University is the first non-Illinois and first private university to join the group. This class joined an inter-campus learning community in which many classes from several schools (most, however, are located at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign) explore their universities and colleges ethnographically. In order to explore Syracuse University ethnographically, we needed to think about what “the university” is, what “ethnography” is, and what “scholarship in action” is. Broadly, we explored the university as a composite of prose, numerical, and visual narratives. [1]
    The Ethnography of the University: Studying Scholarship in Action was designed to introduce undergraduate students to ethnographic methodologies, institutional analysis, and the research publication process. Students conducted ethnographic studies of Syracuse University Scholarship in Action projects of their choosing and had the opportunity to produce their results on the web. All the steps in the research process, from the formation of research questions to the creation of final research papers, was produced on-line at a collaborative website, Moodle, that has been created at the University of Illinois to facilitate undergraduate ethnography of the university projects. This project is titled the Ethnography of the University Initiative (EUI). [1]
    The purpose of this class was to provide students with opportunities to engage in a scholarly examination of research and practices associated with museum interpretation to diverse audiences; and to lead in the development and implementation of Krannert Art Museum educational programs and outreach a ctivities with selected local audiences. [2]
    This class was designed to consider how museum audience development perspectives and research are translated into practices that meet the needs and interests of culturally diverse audiences. Course readings, writing assignments, research, inquiry activities, and presentations provided students with opportunities for examination of museum interpretive practices, programming decisions, and public engagement activities, as well as analysis of Krannert Art Museum’s presence on the university campus, in the larger community, and on the World Wide Web. Students were expected to develop innovative museum educational approaches that increase the accessibility of the artwork in Krannert Art Museum to culturally diverse audiences. Student research and development involved study of the museum’s multicultural permanent collection and temporary exhibitions; studies of local audiences; and studies of educational programming, and museum curricular materials. New practices developed by students also explored how new media technologies can be incorporated into museum educational practices. [2]
    This course offered an introduction to the interdisciplinary critical whiteness studies literature and addressed concepts such as the social construction of race, white privilege, white racial identity development, and white anti-racism. It also focused on various qualitative research methods that scholars use in the empirical investigation of whiteness. Throughout the course, we considered the ways in which the various content and methods may apply to understanding whiteness at predominantly white universities. As part of the Ethnography of the University Initiative, we worked together to establish a collegial research community in the class. Thus, students developed their independent research projects, and they were expected to strengthen their understanding of the research process and self-efficacy as researchers. By effectively investigating some aspect of whiteness at the University of Illinois, this course aimed at contributing in meaningful ways to understanding how whiteness operates in one of the contexts in which we live. [5]
    This course took an in-depth look at some of the residents from Latin America who live in the Urbana-Champaign community. In this intensive eight-week course, students worked to capture, interpret, and present the stories of Latin Americans living, working, and studying at the U of I. Through oral histories, students explored Latin Americans’ memories of their home countries, their current ties to home, and their lives here in Urbana-Champaign. We considered what can be learned from these stories, and thought about how we might use them to educate others in our community about Latin America today. Each student was responsible for planning, researching, and conducting one audio-recorded oral-history interview with a U of I faculty, staff or student who is of Latin American origin. Through these oral histories we focused on 1) the interviewees’ descriptions/memories of their place of origin, 2) how they come to the U of I, and 3) whether and how the U of I figures into their transnational stories. The collective goal for the course was to build a small collection of audio-recorded oral histories that future students and teachers can use to develop K-12 educational materials about Latin America through the Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies. [1]
    When did Muslims arrive in the Americas? What is the history of Muslim immigrants in the United States? This course was an introduction to the study of Muslims in the United States. In examining the multiple racial, cultural, and national groups that make-up this diverse community, students questioned what it means to be Muslim in America. The course began with the first contact between Islam and America in the “Age of Discovery” and the African slave trade to think through the roots of Islam and its role in the contemporary moment. In this moment students also examined how indigenous Americans, referred to as American Indians, are conceptualized in relation to the Muslims of Europe and simultaneously racialized. In historicizing Islam students examined the communities who first arrived as crypto-Muslims to understand the place of Latinos in American Islam. Second, students examined African American Islam in its myriad formations. These two examples were then used comparatively to understand how the historical narrative of African American and Latino Muslims is related to newer immigrant populations. In large part, students surveyed Arab American and South Asian American Muslim communities particularly in urban contexts. These later two populations grew through large immigrant waves in the 19th century and the late twentieth century, particularly after 1965. In addition to the multi-racial and comparative perspective, this course examined intra-religious (sectarian) and interfaith differences and dialogues. This material was explored through an interdisciplinary approach focusing on the scholarship mainly from anthropology, history, sociology, religious studies, and ethnic studies. For many of class discussions this course used Chicago as an ethnographic site to explore the complex make-up and history of Muslim America. [1]