Browse The University and the Community by Series/Report

    Series/Report
    EALC 398; Fall 2012 [1]
    EPS 500pf1: Race and Ethnography: A Study of the University, Prof. Priscilla Fortier. As a member of this course students join a campus-wide learning community in which the University of Illinois is being explored ethnographically. Students begin the course by thinking about what the university is, as well as about race and ethnicity as phenomena within the university's narratives. One area of concentration will be "ethnography," and students learn and practice the basic skills of observation, interviewing, and writing as an ethnographer. They complete several relatively short assignments that are intended to help them develop these skills, as well as one larger ethnographic project on the University. The latter allows students to explore an aspect of the university that has to do with as issue of race or ethnicity. The course syllabus is available at: www.eui.uiuc.edu/docs/syllabi/EPS500F07.doc [1]
    Fall 2012; History 396B Oral History; Mireya Loza, Instructor [1]
    GWS 467/HIST 396 Locating Queer Culture Spring 2012 [1]
    History 490 Spring 2012 Independent Study (Senior Thesis) [1]
    In addition to an engagement of texts from different academic disciplines to provide students with theoretical perspectives of young people, this course provided students with first hand research experience as part of The Ethnography of the University Initiative (EUI) by engaging students in the research process and meaningfully interrogated the U of I. Students were expected to conduct ethnographic (field research and/or archive based) project that takes up some aspect of Asian American youth at the U of I. [2]
    In this Rhetoric 105 class students were expected to: 1. develop skills as readers and writers by reading and writing sophisticated prose, including ethnographic papers/books/articles and research papers/journals/books/articles; 2. experience writing as a process of revision and collaboration, where longer, more complex pieces grow out of earlier work—ideas, collaboration, field notes, summaries, abstracts, data tables, charts, and graphs; 3. reflect and analyze conventional and personal reading and writing processes as readers and writers while reading, writing about, and discussing the texts of the course: published work, peers’ work, as well as personal work; 4. become more practiced at using writing as a means of investigation, writing as an early strategy for discovering and for answering questions, thus challenging the commonplace belief that all writing is designed to prove something once and for all; 5. identify and connect the intellectual and philosophical insights that arise when reading and writing personal and ethnographic essays, to the contexts of our day to day lives; 6. accomplish 1-5 above within a course context dedicated to investigating Race and Ethnicity here at UIUC and elsewhere through theorizing and practicing the art of writing and critiquing personal, ethnographic, academic papers, and various forms of data presentation. [2]
    Instructor, Cody Caudill [3]
    Instructor, Leslie Reagan [1]
    Instructor, Nancy Abelmann [1]
    Instructor, Siobhan Somerville [1]
    It is important to remember that “The Ethnography of the University” is not only a course but also part of two larger projects, the “Imagining America Project,” a national project combining the arts, humanities and social sciences to create interdisciplinary discussions about America’s future http://www.imaginingamerica.org/ , and the University of Illinois centered project, the Ethnography of the University Initiative (EUI) http://www.eui.uiuc.edu/. [1]
    KIN 249 Fall 2010 [1]
    Our goal for this course was to create original research projects about queer culture, with a special focus on our local context, the University of Illinois, in relation to the surrounding Urbana-Champaign area. Our guiding questions included: What are the various ways of defining “queer”? What counts as “culture”? Where do we find queer culture? How is queer culture produced, sustained, or transformed? How do institutions (such as universities) help to produce or erase queer culture? What roles do race, class, and/or gender play in the production and/or visibility of queer culture? Our course texts included selected examples of queer cultural production, including film, novels, television, magazines, and music. Assignments were designed around two research projects: (1) an archival research project on some aspect of local queer history and (2) an ethnographic research project on some aspect of contemporary local queer culture. [1]
    Parkland Community College; English 106; Spring 2011 [1]
    Prof. Anne Sautman [2]
    Prof. Junaid Rana [1]
    Prof. Soo Ah Kwon [2]
    Professor Thomas Herakovich [2]
    Rhet 102: Race and the University, Instr. Eve Eure: This course engages issues of race, diversity and representation at the University of Illinois. Students are encouraged to think about what the university is, as well as about race and ethnicity as a phenomena within the university’s narratives. The readings in the course interrogate U.S. race politics as a way to contextualize our understanding of the relationship between race and the University of Illinois. Students write both long and short essays which critically analyze the readings done both inside and outside of the classroom. This is achieved by a series of writing assignments, which prepare students to look at these various aspects of campus culture which might not otherwise be questioned and/or studied in a critical manner. Students build upon these initial studies to create a larger research project that brings them into conversation with their environment and other scholars, as well as research of previous students. The course syllabus is available at: www.eui.uiuc.edu/docs/syllabi/RHET102S08.doc [1]