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Title:Towards a Science of Mind: Schizophrenia, Mysticism, Artistic Creativity, Scientific Discovery, Psychedelic Experience and Extrasensory Perception as Functions of a Symbo-Organismic Scheme of Human Mental Functioning
Author(s):Ellingham, Ivan Halford
Department / Program:Psychology
Discipline:Psychology
Degree Granting Institution:University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree:Ph.D.
Genre:Dissertation
Subject(s):Psychology, General
Abstract:This work addresses the issue of modern psychology's lack of a unitary conceptual frame by which to interpret its subject matter scientifically.
Presented is a hierarchical "symbo-organismic" scheme of human mental functioning based in the main on the views of Ernst Cassirer, Susanne Langer, Michael Polanyi, and Alfred North Whitehead. The claim is made that this scheme has wide reference and that it symbolizes the common "logical form" intrinsic to the evolutionary development of human mentality, to its ontogenetic development and to its microgenetic manifestations.
As an earnest of the pervasive pertinence of the aforesaid scheme in terms of its structure six different modes of human mental functioning--schizophrenia, mysticism, artistic creativity, scientific discovery, psychedelic experience, and extrasensory perception--are individually gauged and determined to be significantly interrelated.
Corroborating evidence for the validity of such a schematic interpretation is provided through the auspices of an appended case study, a work which recounts a personally experienced "augmented" condition of consciousness.
Issue Date:1984
Type:Text
Language:English
Description:767 p.
Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1984.
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/77430
Other Identifier(s):(UMI)AAI8409767
Date Available in IDEALS:2015-05-13
Date Deposited:1984


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