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Title:Regional variation in work absence cultures in the United States
Author(s):Hernandez, Jorge Ivan
Director of Research:Newman, Daniel A.
Doctoral Committee Chair(s):Newman, Daniel A.
Doctoral Committee Member(s):Cohen, Dov; Vargas, Patrick T.; Rounds, James; Hulin, Charles L.
Department / Program:Psychology
Discipline:Psychology
Degree Granting Institution:University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree:Ph.D.
Genre:Dissertation
Subject(s):Absenteeism
Social Disorganization
Culture
Regional Variation
Abstract:This paper offers a cultural perspective to the work absenteeism literature, by conceptualizing work absence at the U.S. state level of analysis, and by assessing absenteeism as a manifestation of regional cultures. First, I establish that absenteeism is a spatially dependent phenomenon, and demonstrate that the retest reliability of absenteeism increases at higher levels of aggregation (from individual-level to city-level to state-level), to provide evidence for absence as a state-level construct. Second, I hypothesize main effects of regional cultures on state-level work absenteeism (i.e., in the U.S. West). Third, I assess whether observed regional differences in state-level absence cultures in the West are attributable to (mediated by) regional differences in state-level social disorganization/anomie, while controlling for state-level variance in work industry (e.g., manufacturing), personality (Extraversion, Neuroticism), unemployment rates, and physical disabilities. Analyzing data spanning over 4 years and over 3 million people per year, this paper explains how absenteeism varies across states in the U.S.
Issue Date:2015-04-24
Type:Thesis
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/78468
Rights Information:Copyright 2015 Jorge Hernandez
Date Available in IDEALS:2015-07-22
Date Deposited:May 2015


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