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Title:Music and communication in Enlightenment Rome: doctrine, instruction, socialization, and style in the vocal works of the Collegio Nazareno (1704-1784)
Author(s):Prats Arolas, Ignacio
Director of Research:Hill, John Walter
Doctoral Committee Chair(s):Hill, John Walter
Doctoral Committee Member(s):Bashford, Christina; Moersch, Charlotte Mattax; Ward, Tom
Department / Program:Music
Discipline:Musicology
Degree Granting Institution:University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree:Ph.D.
Genre:Dissertation
Subject(s):Cultural History of Music
Eighteenth-century
Rome
Collegio Nazareno
Piarists
Scolopi
History of Theology
Jansenism
Church Music
Oratorio
Cantata
Pastorale
Sinfonia
Ecotypes
Rhetoric
Musical Semiotics
Social Theory
Metaphor
Style Criticism
Music Theory
Joseph Riepel
Fortspinnung
Absatz
Niccolò Jommelli
Rinaldo di Capua
Marcello di Capua
Gian Luca Bandini
Martino Natali
Giambattista Molinelli
Joseph Calasanz
Taste
Baroque
Classical
Galant Style
Abstract:This is a cultural and stylistic study of the main corpus of unpublished musical works currently preserved in the Archivio Generale Storico delle Scuole Pie (AGSP), in Rome. This corpus is primarily made up of forty-nine Italian-texted, religious cantatas, oratorios (or componimenti sacri), and pastorales, commissioned by and performed at the Collegio Nazareno, in Rome, as part of the accademie literarie that took place annually there, at least, between 1681 and 1784. The Collegio Nazareno, a Piarist educational institution founded in 1622, became a prestigious school during the eighteenth century. A leading school, as far as the practice of letters and empirical sciences is concerned, it also hosted important Jansenist-influenced theologians. This cultural environment is commensurate with the intellectual, religious, and political aims of the so-called Catholic Enlightenment. The highly elaborated librettos, musical compositions, and performances produced in this institution were an essential part of a series of specific practices and rituals embodying that cultural atmosphere. They were thus important communicational vehicles for doctrine, instruction, and socialization. In this regard, and with heavy reliance on rhetoric, semiotics, and social theory, special attention is paid to how theological, literary, and scientific elements were combined and presented in the musical compositions. Particularly, Niccolò Jommelli’s oratorio Giuseppe glorificato in Egitto (1749) and Rinaldo di Capua’s L’angelo di Tobia (1768) are analyzed as musical portrayals of St. Joseph Calasanz, in correspondence with Catholic-Enlightenment ideals of holiness. References to music-style features, based on period theory, principally Joseph Riepel’s theory of musical phrase, run across this study also in connection with broader cultural aspects.
Issue Date:2015-04-23
Type:Thesis
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/78626
Rights Information:Copyright 2015 Ignacio Prats Arolas
Date Available in IDEALS:2015-07-22
Date Deposited:May 2015


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