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Title:Optimizing construction and utilization of wheat storage facilities to minimize post-harvest losses
Author(s):Ibrahim, Hatem Ibrahim
Director of Research:El-Rayes, Khaled A.; Hashash, Youssef
Doctoral Committee Chair(s):El-Rayes, Khaled A.; Hashash, Youssef
Doctoral Committee Member(s):Liu, Liang Y.; Golparvar-Fard, Mani
Department / Program:Civil & Environmental Eng
Discipline:Civil Engineering
Degree Granting Institution:University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree:Ph.D.
Genre:Dissertation
Subject(s):Optimization
Wheat
Construction
Storage
Transportation
Post Harvest Loss
Abstract:The use of inefficient wheat storage and transportation facilities in developing countries often causes significant quantity and quality losses. These post-harvest losses are estimated to be as much as 20% of harvested wheat and a study by the Government of India puts the total preventable wheat losses at 10% of total production. These post-harvest wheat losses in developing countries can be minimized by (1) optimizing wheat storage and transportation throughout the entire supply chain network of existing facilities in villages, local markets, and regional locations; (2) constructing new public storage facilities that are funded and/or subsidized by government to expand and improve the existing storage facilities; and (3) building new private storage facilities that are funded by farmers to minimize post-harvest losses, maximize profitability of farmers, and improve their food security. The main goal of this research study is to develop novel models for optimizing the storage and transportation of wheat to minimize post-harvest losses. To accomplish this, the research objectives of this study are to (1) conduct a comprehensive literature review to study local conditions, (2) develop a novel model for optimizing the storage and transportation of wheat using existing facilities in developing countries, (3) develop an innovative model for optimizing the construction of public wheat storage facilities that are funded and/or subsidized by government or other agencies, and (4) develop a novel model for optimizing the construction and utilization of private wheat storage facilities that are cooperatively funded by farmers. The performance of the developed optimization models is analyzed and verified using case studies. The results of these case studies illustrate the novel and unique capabilities of the developed models in searching for and identifying optimal storage and transportation decisions. These new and unique capabilities are expected to support decision makers such as governments and farmers in identifying (i) optimal wheat storage levels in each existing facility and optimal transportation routes among them to minimize post-harvest losses and minimize storage and transportation costs throughout the entire network; (ii) optimal location, type, and capacity for the construction of new publicly-funded storage facilities to minimize post-harvest losses during storage and transportation throughout the entire network; and (iii) optimal construction decisions for privately-funded storage facilities and optimal wheat sales, purchases and storage quantities to minimize post-harvest losses and maximize the profit of farmers. The expected impact of the developed optimization models include (a) reduced post-harvest losses during wheat storage and transportation; (b) minimized storage and transportation costs throughout the entire network of existing and new storage facilities; (c) increased annual profits for farmers; (d) enhanced food security for local farmers by increasing the storage capacity in their villages; and (e) expanded storage capacity for grain reserves and for potential increases in wheat production.
Issue Date:2015-04-16
Type:Thesis
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/78737
Rights Information:Copyright 2015 Hatem Ibrahim
Date Available in IDEALS:2015-07-22
Date Deposited:May 2015


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