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Title:The First, Fifth, and Fourteenth Amendment rights to access equal information in America's public schools
Author(s):Ash, Carey Laroy Hawkins
Director of Research:Anderson, James D.
Doctoral Committee Chair(s):Anderson, James D.
Doctoral Committee Member(s):Alexander, S. Kern; Dixson, Adrienne D.; Sharpe, Jamelle C.; Trent, William T.
Department / Program:Educ Policy, Orgzn & Leadrshp
Discipline:Educ Policy, Orgzn & Leadrshp
Degree Granting Institution:University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree:Ph.D.
Genre:Dissertation
Subject(s):United States
America
First Amendment
Fifth Amendment
Fourteenth Amendment
public
school
education
Access
unequal
property
tax
Brown
Sweatt
Goss
San Antonio
Plyler
children
Knowledge
economy
funding
finance
equal
Liberty
property
information
stigma
critical
thinking
critical race praxis
critical race theory
critical legal studies
law
Program for International Student Assessment (PISA)
opportunity
globalized
Allen
Roth
Brandenburg
Gitlow
Grosjean
Houchins
Kimel
Kleindienst
Meyer
O'Connor
Tinker
Abstract:America’s public school system finds itself strongly challenged at a time when both domestic and world affairs call upon us to rethink the way we develop and prepare our country’s citizens. Unfortunately, countless students in school districts across the Nation daily receive unequal access to information in school, resulting from the inequitable distribution of resources caused by property tax based systems of funding public education. The Supreme Court declared in Sweatt v. Painter, 339 U.S. 629 (1950), and Brown v. Board of Education, 347 U.S. 483 (1954), that every student is entitled to equal access to equal information undergirding the critical thinking training they receive in schools. However, the Supreme Court sanctioned school funding disparities caused by property tax based systems by claiming that there is no fundamental right to an education in the United States per the Court’s ruling in San Antonio v. Rodriguez, 411 U.S. 1 (1973). As a result, this paper asserts that the funding disparities resulting from property tax based school funding systems is the chief cause of disparate access to information in schools based purely on where students live. Disparate access to information in schools in turn leads to disparities in critical thinking training since the depth and degree of critical thinking training depends on one’s access to information in school. Disparate access to information in America’s public schools violates students’ First, Fifth, and Fourteenth Amendment rights and adversely affects our children for a lifetime.
Issue Date:2015-04-23
Type:Thesis
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/78775
Rights Information:Copyright 2015 Carey Hawkins Ash
Date Available in IDEALS:2015-07-22
Date Deposited:May 2015


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