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Title:Cultural Mistrust, Self -Efficacy, and Outcome Expectations as Predictors of Academic and Psychosocial Adjustment for African -American College Students at Predominantly White Universities
Author(s):Bell, Tyronn John
Doctoral Committee Chair(s):Terence J.G.Tracey
Department / Program:Education
Discipline:Education
Degree Granting Institution:University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree:Ph.D.
Genre:Dissertation
Subject(s):Black Studies
Abstract:Predictors of academic and psychosocial adjustment for African American students attending a predominantly White university were investigated in this study. Two-hundred and nine African American students attending a large, predominantly White, state university in the Midwest were surveyed. Cultural mistrust, self-efficacy, and outcome expectations were the predictor variables while academic adjustment, social adjustment, personal-emotional adjustment, and attachment to the university were the criterion variables. Cultural mistrust, self-efficacy, and outcome expectations were hypothesized to be significant predictors of the criterion variables. As part of this investigation, an instrument was developed to measure African American students' self-efficacy beliefs and outcome expectations. Confirmatory factor analyses yielded general support for the factor structure of this instrument. Regression analyses revealed that academic self-efficacy for interacting with Whites on campus was a significant predictor of all four criterion variables. Social expectations about other African American on campus was a small, but statistically significant predictor of academic adjustment and attachment to the university. For first year students in the sample, academic self-efficacy beliefs for interacting with Whites was the only significant predictor for all four criterion variables. It was also hypothesized that cultural mistrust would moderate the relationship between self-efficacy and the criterion variables, and between outcome expectations and the criterion variables. Some support for this hypothesis was found. Outcome expectations were hypothesized to moderate the relationship between self-efficacy and the criterion variables, and some support for this relationship was found. Implications of this study for the adjustment process of African American students attending a predominantly White university are offered.
Issue Date:2003
Type:Text
Language:English
Description:74 p.
Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2003.
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/79718
Other Identifier(s):(MiAaPQ)AAI3086014
Date Available in IDEALS:2015-09-25
Date Deposited:2003


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