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Title:Testing a Biopsychosocial Model of Perceived Racism Among Latinos
Author(s):Walters, Jessica Melinda
Doctoral Committee Chair(s):Neville, Helen A.
Department / Program:Education
Discipline:Education
Degree Granting Institution:University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree:Ph.D.
Genre:Dissertation
Subject(s):Sociology, Ethnic and Racial Studies
Abstract:Scholars are beginning to acknowledge the function of perceived racism as a psychological stressor and have developed models to examine the interplay between perceived racism, stress, coping, and health. There are few comprehensive studies of racism related stress with the notable exception of Clark, Anderson, Clark, and Williams' (1999) biopsychosocial model. The major objective of this study was to test a modified Clark and colleagues (1999) biopsychosocial model of the racism-health link among Latinos. Nearly 225 Latino college students completed a paper-and-pencil survey, which included a number of measures: Everyday Perceived Racial Discrimination Index (Jackson & Williams, 1995), The Social Health Battery (Rand Corporation, 1978), Mental Health Inventory-18 (Berwick, Murphy, Goldman, Ware, Barsky, & Weinstein, 1991), the Physical Symptoms Index (Moos, Cronkite, Billings, & Finney, 1985). Using path analysis, findings provided empirical support for the proposed model. Specific pathways suggested that social class and skin tone predicted perceived racism. Self-reported darker skin color and lower social class level were related to increased perceptions of racism, which in turn was related to greater levels of racism related stress. There was a significant pathway between racism related stress and health outcomes. The relationship between racism related stress and both mental and physical health was not moderated by coping skills. Theoretical and clinical implications are discussed and suggestions for future research are provided.
Issue Date:2004
Type:Text
Language:English
Description:106 p.
Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2004.
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/79813
Other Identifier(s):(MiAaPQ)AAI3153452
Date Available in IDEALS:2015-09-25
Date Deposited:2004


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