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Title:Beliefs About the Causes of Social Success: Development During Early Adolescence, Consequences for Students' Social Goals, and Variations by Gender and Ethnicity
Author(s):Kiefer, Sarah Marie
Doctoral Committee Chair(s):Ryan, Allison
Department / Program:Educational Psychology
Discipline:Educational Psychology
Degree Granting Institution:University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree:Ph.D.
Genre:Dissertation
Subject(s):Education, Elementary
Abstract:The present study investigated the development of beliefs about social success and the impact of beliefs on subsequent social goals (dominance, popularity and intimacy) for early adolescents in urban, low-income schools. Self-reports of beliefs about social success in the fall of the sixth grade were used to predict subsequent social goals across the sixth grade (elementary school) and seventh grade (middle school) (N = 731; 53% females; 53% African American, 47% white). In line with hypotheses, there were significant changes in beliefs about social success during early adolescence, and beliefs explained changes in subsequent social goals. Sincere and responsible beliefs decreased significantly, while status, tough, and pretend to care beliefs increased significantly across the two years. Tough and pretend to care beliefs explained changes in dominance goals. In contrast, status beliefs explained changes in popularity goals, and sincere beliefs explained changes in intimacy goals. There were also gender and ethnic differences in the development of beliefs about social success as well as the impact of beliefs on social goals. Thus, this study expands our understanding of social motivation and development during early adolescence by highlighting dramatic changes in beliefs about social success and the unique impact of beliefs on subsequent social goals, and has implications for supporting students' social goals in school.
Issue Date:2007
Type:Text
Language:English
Description:99 p.
Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2007.
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/79982
Other Identifier(s):(MiAaPQ)AAI3269942
Date Available in IDEALS:2015-09-25
Date Deposited:2007


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