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Title:Electro-Mechanical Interactions in Superconducting Spoke -Loaded Cavities
Author(s):Conway, Zachary A.
Doctoral Committee Chair(s):Debevec, Paul T.
Department / Program:Physics
Discipline:Physics
Degree Granting Institution:University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree:Ph.D.
Genre:Dissertation
Subject(s):Engineering, Electronics and Electrical
Abstract:This dissertation reports an investigation of the mechanical and electromagnetic properties of a beta = 0.4 double-spoke-loaded and a beta = 0.5 triple-spoke-loaded superconducting cavity at Argonne National Laboratory. These cavities are of interest in new heavy-ion and proton linear accelerators. We present a powerful method for characterizing arbitrary time-dependent Lorentz force induced detuning of superconducting cavities; the convolution of the Lorentz transfer function and the cavity accelerating gradient. Using the beta = 0.5 triple-spoke-loaded superconducting cavity the Lorentz transfer function is shown to accurately predict the cavity response to RF field pulses. We present experimental data characterizing the microphonic-noise of the beta = 0.4 double-spoke-loaded superconducting cavity and the subsequent design and testing of the beta = 0.5 triple-spoke-loaded superconducting cavity. The beta = 0.5 triple-spoke-loaded superconducting cavity rms microphonic-noise is less than 0.5 Hz, an improvement by an order of magnitude over the beta = 0.4 double-spoke-loaded superconducting cavity. Finally, electromechanical frequency and phase control methods to compensate the microphonic-noise of superconducting spoke-loaded cavities are presented. The techniques and methods developed here advance characterization and tuning techniques which are beneficial for all superconducting cavities and enable the use of spoke-loaded cavities in future accelerators.
Issue Date:2007
Type:Text
Language:English
Description:103 p.
Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2007.
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/80559
Other Identifier(s):(MiAaPQ)AAI3301121
Date Available in IDEALS:2015-09-25
Date Deposited:2007


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