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    Series/Report
    ANTH 411: Methods for Sociocultural Anthropology, Prof. Nancy Abelmann. This course introduced students to a variety of ethnographic methods. Students tried their hand at some of these methods through a focused project. I had students think about their semester-long work as "pilot research"; although they did write up a short paper on their findings (their "discuss" section of the database), the culminating assignment was a research proposal in which they envision building on their preliminary findings in a longer/larger project. In the beginning of the semester, students did some warm-up exercises not directly related to their projects (an observation, an analysis of a university document, and an interview) -- some students elected to remove these from their databases while others left them in because of their connection to the final project. Students' "question" and "plan" sections of the database include multiple entries as I encouraged them to continue to refine these over the course of the semester in dialogue with their own emerging findings. I also asked students to search both the U of I Student Life and Cultures Archives and well as this EUI IDEALS collection to find archives relevant to their pilot/proposed research. All students were asked to "reflect" on the research experience and to make "recommendations" to the University on the basis of their research findings. The course syllabus is available at: www.eui.uiuc.edu/docs/syllabi/ANTH411F07.doc [18]
    ANTH 411; Fall 2010 [16]
    Cody Caudill, Instructor [4]
    Deanna Williams, Instructor [8]
    EALC 365 Spring 2012 Contemporary Korean Society [2]
    Ellen Moodie, Instructor [16]
    Fall 2012; Rhetoric 105; Linda Larsen, Instructor [2]
    In this course we explore important issues in the study of Contemporary Korean Society and ask how those themes can help us to better understand processes of globalization in East Asia and beyond. Although the Koreas are relatively small countries in Asia, as Michael Robinson writes, “They have played a disproportionately important role in the last hundred years of world history” (2007:1). Their history of colonialism, the Korean War, coming of age in the Cold War, and struggling to rise to the top of the global stage makes them a productive region of the world for thinking about themes such as globalization, nationalism, belonging and modernity. In the first half of the course we look at Korea’s global roots and see how North and South Korea have diverged in their struggle to modernize. In the second half of the course we focus on South Korea’s efforts to define its national identity, and in doing so, have caused many exceptional cases to emerge. We look at issues such as the Korean diaspora, immigration, plastic surgery, and how even as the desire for an English-language education forces South Koreans to travel abroad, the ‘Korean Wave’ of film, TV and music is hitting the shores of most countries in Asia (and worldwide) and has made Korea an enviable producer of global cultural products. We pair ethnographies, historical texts and anthropological articles focused on Korea with key texts in the anthropology of globalization. Additionally we use both documentary and feature film to analyze class themes. [2]
    Instructor, Cody Caudill [9]
    Instructor, Erica Vogel [2]
    It is important to remember that “The Ethnography of the University” is not only a course but also part of two larger projects, the “Imagining America Project,” a national project combining the arts, humanities and social sciences to create interdisciplinary discussions about America’s future http://www.imaginingamerica.org/ , and the University of Illinois centered project, the Ethnography of the University Initiative (EUI) http://www.eui.uiuc.edu/. [5]
    Parkland Community College; English 106; Spring 2011 [6]
    Prof. Kristin McCann [6]
    RHET 105, Spring 2012 [9]
    RHET105 Fall 2011: Principles of Composition [8]
    RHET105 Principles of Composing [1]
    Rhetoric 102 Race and the University is the second course in the year long composition requirement at the University of Illinois. Students build their academic writing skills and develop research strategies with the ultimate goal of completing an in-depth research project. As part of the Ethnography of the University Initiative, this course asks students to examine the "race" and "the university" as topics of inquiry. While reading about important issues in contemporary race discussions and exploring the relationships between race, representation and language, students choose a race-related issue on campus to research through firsthand experience with interviews, field observations, and text analysis in order to create their own original scholarly work. [3]
    Rhetoric 105, Principles of Composition, Race & the University, Instr. Kristin McCann: This course entailed continual negotiation of three primary focuses: academic writing, introduction to ethnographic research methodologies, and critical inquiry into issues of race and representation. I approached this course as a semester-long conversation with students, the texts with which we engaged, and the kairos of the physical and ideological spaces in which we were immersed. I encouraged students to draw upon their expertise as current UIUC undergraduates and to consider their stake in the university’s narratives. Students were, of course, not expected to produce a complete ‘ethnography’; rather, to consider what combination of ethnographic research methodologies might be most useful to their specific essays and research projects and what issues they deemed most exigent for their inquiries. Students also had the opportunity to present at the bi-annual EUI conference, alongside other EUI undergraduate and graduate students. The course syllabus is available at: www.eui.uiuc.edu/docs/syllabi/RHET105S08.doc [6]
    Rhetoric 105/Principles of Composition introduces students to the practices of research-based writing for academic audiences, such as formulating a researchable question, locating sources, constructing an argument, drafting, revising, and editing. This course uses writing, reading, observing, and critical thinking to develop scholarly curiosity. To do this, instructors focus on: deepening research skills, developing students’ abilities to read and respond to difficult texts, and, most importantly, helping students through the writing process in a social, collaborative, revision-focused environment. This particular section of Rhetoric 105 was focused around the theme of “Exploring Student Communities at the University of Illinois.” The assignments and discussions asked students to explore their own experiences as students and consider how various student communities shape our campus culture and identities as students. Over the course of the semester students formulated research questions about a particular campus community and answered them by doing semester-long ethnographic research (observations, interviews, archive analysis, and surveys), including a short video presentation. The kinds of writing studies and conducted were formulated around reflections on these communities. [9]
    Students were encouraged to make their work public so that their research subjects, fellow students and Syracuse community participants, would be able to comment and provide feedback on their research. The IDEALS on-line archive would enable this process to be recorded for future students in the hope that they will build on present student research. The archiving of “scholarship in action” research for ANT 300 may help Syracuse University better understands the learning outcomes of “scholarship in action” initiatives. [8]