Files in this item

FilesDescriptionFormat

application/pdf

application/pdf9912425.pdf (15MB)Restricted to U of Illinois
(no description provided)PDF

Description

Title:The Spy in Early America: The Emergence of a Genre
Author(s):Weir, Alison Marie
Doctoral Committee Chair(s):Emily Stipes Watts
Department / Program:English
Discipline:English
Degree Granting Institution:University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree:Ph.D.
Genre:Dissertation
Subject(s):American Studies
Abstract:The theory of most analyses of "spy fiction" presumes that it emerged as a colonizing literature of the waning days of the British empire. This study, reading spy literature as a much earlier genre, examines American spy fiction as a genre which is both postcolonial and colonizing, reflecting the United States' quirky position as a former colony which began colonizing others even before it won its independence. Anxieties regarding the new social mobility, the freedom of the individual within society, and the increasing centralization of the government are among the many issues American spy fiction addressed through the liminal and paradoxical figure of the heroic spy.
Issue Date:1998
Type:Text
Language:English
Description:253 p.
Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1998.
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/81497
Other Identifier(s):(MiAaPQ)AAI9912425
Date Available in IDEALS:2015-09-25
Date Deposited:1998


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Item Statistics