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Title:The Influence of Time on the Prediction of Performance
Author(s):Burrus, Krista Dervan
Doctoral Committee Chair(s):Drasgow, Fritz
Department / Program:Psychology
Discipline:Psychology
Degree Granting Institution:University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree:Ph.D.
Genre:Dissertation
Subject(s):Psychology, Industrial
Abstract:There is a mounting literature substantiating the importance of both cognitive ability and conscientiousness as valid predictors of job performance across job domains (e.g., Barrick & Mount, 1991; Hogan & Ones, 1997; Hunter & Hunter, 1984; Schmidt & Hunter, 1998); however, relatively little is known about the predictive validity of these factors over time where time reflects tenure on a job or trials on a task. The minimal research suggests that validities of cognitive ability decrease over time (e.g., Henry & Hulin, 1987; Hulin, Henry, & Noon, 1990; Keil, & Cortina, 2001). Practically nothing is known about personality and performance relations over time. This project was designed to study longitudinally the relationships of cognitive ability and conscientiousness with performance to investigate the possible dynamic nature of these relationships. I posited that, unlike cognitive ability, the relationship between performance and conscientiousness will increase over time for consistent tasks, such that the correlation will become increasingly larger in magnitude and positive in direction over trials. The reasoning is that when a task is new, learning must occur, which will be a function of cognitive ability; but the importance of personality will surface once the task has been learned. A pilot study provided initial support for these predictions, and the main study investigated them further. Results revealed that conscientiousness did not become positively correlated with performance over trials; however, the findings suggest that this relationship may emerge over many more trials. Implications and future directions are discussed.
Issue Date:2006
Type:Text
Language:English
Description:78 p.
Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2006.
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/82113
Other Identifier(s):(MiAaPQ)AAI3242804
Date Available in IDEALS:2015-09-25
Date Deposited:2006


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