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Title:Preserved Implicit Semantic Differentiation in an Alexic Wernicke's Aphasic
Author(s):Fernandes, Leyan Oi Lin
Doctoral Committee Chair(s):Miller, Gregory A.
Department / Program:Psychology
Discipline:Psychology
Degree Granting Institution:University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree:Ph.D.
Genre:Dissertation
Subject(s):Psychology, Cognitive
Abstract:Lesions of Wernicke's area are typically associated with functional impairments in word comprehension. These impairments are traditionally assessed with neuropsychological measures that examine overt behavioral responses. The aspects or stages of semantic categorization processes that are disrupted, however, are unknown. These were probed with event-related brain potentials in a case of alexic Wernicke's aphasia. At 10 weeks post-infarct, the patient performed 3 tasks: a 2-category, non-semantic visual oddball; a 3-category, semantic visual oddball; and a word-to-picture card-sorting task. ERPs collected during the oddball tasks were analyzed using the bootstrap method, a non-parametric technique for estimating a population distribution from a single sample's data. In the non-semantic oddball paradigm, which served as a baseline for the semantic oddball paradigm, a classic P300 probability effect was obtained. In the semantic oddball paradigm, where the subject was asked to decide whether words were animals, N400 was larger for semantically anomalous fish words than for frequent mammal words. Evidence for P300 enhancement for rare, semantically distinct musical instrument words was not decisive. Response accuracy revealed no misclassifications of stimuli during the non-semantic task, but overt performance approximated chance for the semantic oddball and card-sorting tasks. The dissociation of N400 and overt performance reveals that implicit semantic differentiation can be preserved in alexic Wernicke's aphasia.
Issue Date:1999
Type:Text
Language:English
Description:101 p.
Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1999.
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/82285
Other Identifier(s):(MiAaPQ)AAI9953013
Date Available in IDEALS:2015-09-25
Date Deposited:1999


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