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Title:Indirect Election and the Democratization of the United States Senate: Constitutional Design, Historical Development, Roll Call Voting, and the Outcome of National Election
Author(s):Sopp, James Reber
Doctoral Committee Chair(s):Paul J. Quirk
Department / Program:Political Science
Discipline:Political Science
Degree Granting Institution:University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree:Ph.D.
Genre:Dissertation
Subject(s):History, United States
Abstract:The goal of this dissertation is to make a series of interrelated points regarding the relationship between ideas, institutions, and behavior with respect to indirect election and the United States Senate. The dissertation begins with an investigation of the origins and development of the Classical Republican and Classical Liberal principles that laid the foundation for indirect election in the American Constitution. The dissertation then goes on to explore the institutional, socioeconomic, and political factors responsible for the decline in the popularity of indirect election of the federal Senate in the aftermath of the Civil War. The dissertation then presents a detailed analysis of U.S. Senate roll call votes related to issues of federal power (vis-a-vis state power) and broad socioeconomic interests (vis-a-vis narrow socioeconomic interests) to investigate what impact direct and indirect election had upon the voting behavior of Senators. Finally, the dissertation investigates the impact of direct and indirect election upon the outcome of national elections, i.e. the frequency of divided government, the frequency of split Congresses, the average length of a single party's majority control of the Senate, the disruption of seat to vote ratios, and the question of partisan advantage.
Issue Date:1999
Type:Text
Language:English
Description:216 p.
Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1999.
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/82600
Other Identifier(s):(MiAaPQ)AAI9921736
Date Available in IDEALS:2015-09-25
Date Deposited:1999


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