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Title:Spatial Models of Animal Disease Control in South America: The Case of Foot -and -Mouth Disease
Author(s):Rich, Karl
Doctoral Committee Chair(s):Winter-Nelson, Alex
Department / Program:Agricultural and Consumer Elconomics
Discipline:Agricultural and Consumer Elconomics
Degree Granting Institution:University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree:Ph.D.
Genre:Dissertation
Subject(s):Economics, Agricultural
Abstract:This research presents three complementary models of FMD control. The first model is a spatially sensitive epidemiological representation of disease spread. The second model is integrated with the first model to determine the short and long run regional and aggregate costs and benefits of alternative mitigation strategies. Results from the integrated epidemiological-economic model indicate that the highest long-term benefits arise from a combined strategy of vaccination in Paraguay and stamping out in the rest of the Southern Cone, though this is sensitive to the size of the outbreak and certain parameter assumptions. While this strategy yields the maximum benefit of those considered, the gains are not distributed equally over the different regions in the Southern Cone. The third model analyzes FMD control behavior in the context of spatial interactions between actors, emphasizing how countervailing incentives based on asymmetries resulting from location and endowments mitigate successful control efforts in the Southern Cone. This model is based on recent literature on social interactions and combines theoretical results using spatial games with cellular automata simulations. The analysis illustrates the difficulties in disease control efforts in the presence of spatial interactions and provides new theoretical insights on spatial games, through the incorporation of heterogeneous incentives and fixed boundaries in the analysis.
Issue Date:2005
Type:Text
Language:English
Description:342 p.
Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2005.
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/82976
Other Identifier(s):(MiAaPQ)AAI3182362
Date Available in IDEALS:2015-09-25
Date Deposited:2005


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