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Title:Design and Evaluation of Permit Programs for Regulating Surface Water Withdrawal Under Riparian Legal System
Author(s):An, Hyunhee
Doctoral Committee Chair(s):Eheart, J. Wayland
Department / Program:Civl and Environmental Engineering
Discipline:Civl and Environmental Engineering
Degree Granting Institution:University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree:Ph.D.
Genre:Dissertation
Subject(s):Engineering, Environmental
Abstract:Evaluation of two regulatory programs conducted for the three quantifiable objectives concludes that the fixed flow program is able to provide higher net benefit but more significant low flow frequency and withdrawal interruption frequency than the fractional flow program which rarely changes the general trend of the natural flow regime. The stability-oriented regulatory programs that combine process control techniques, i.e., the first-order filter and PID control are introduced and applied for controlling streamflow variability problem. The results suggests that water managers operating under the authority of a law like the Regulated Riparian Model Water Code adopt the fractional flow program as a fundamental algorithm for allocation of permits for a "normal" situation, i.e., one in which streamflow standards are rarely breached. They should then consider adoption of the first-order filter withdrawal algorithm for cases where over-allocation or other factors are likely to result in excessive steamflow oscillation. Robustness of programs is ensured through allowance of permit trading. Under both programs, permit trading contributes to efficient uses of water without significant sacrifice in low flow and withdrawal interruption frequencies. It shows the effects of trading need to be evaluated to understand the complete spectrum of economic and social benefits associated with adoption of alternative regulatory programs.
Issue Date:2004
Type:Text
Language:English
Description:137 p.
Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2004.
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/83247
Other Identifier(s):(MiAaPQ)AAI3160857
Date Available in IDEALS:2015-09-25
Date Deposited:2004


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