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Title:Sensing Molecular Adsorption Through Interfacial Electron Scattering in Atom -Scale Junctions
Author(s):Castle, Patrick James
Doctoral Committee Chair(s):Bohn, Paul W.
Department / Program:Chemistry
Discipline:Chemistry
Degree Granting Institution:University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree:Ph.D.
Genre:Dissertation
Subject(s):Chemistry, Analytical
Abstract:The goal of this work was to fabricate Au atom-scale junctions as the basis for robust, regenerable, nanostructured sensors to use with mass-limited samples for improved protection of health and safety. Atom-scale junctions were formed between two Au thin film electrodes. The inter-electrode gap was lithographically defined, and a microfluidic channel was aligned over the inter-electrode gap. The inter-electrode gap was reduced with electrodeposition, which was terminated at an atom-scale junction by setting a comparator to trigger a relay at a current corresponding to a junction conductance comparable to the conductance quantum. Based on conductance measurements and estimates from SEM images, atom-scale junctions were successfully formed. Lewis bases were introduced to atom-scale junctions, and the resulting alternating current impedance change was measured. For example, the interfacial scattering from chemisorption of 10 mM hexadecanethiol (HDT) on a 2.6 G0 atom-scale junction caused a normalized impedance change of 71% +/- 1%, with a noise level consistent with a population fluctuation of only 1 HDT molecule. To regenerate the device in situ, the junction was broken with a potential sweep and reformed with comparator-terminated electrodeposition. The atom-scale junction capability to measure small numbers of adsorption/desorption events makes a powerful case for pushing the limits of sensitivity for electrical measurements of single molecule events.
Issue Date:2005
Type:Text
Language:English
Description:142 p.
Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2005.
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/84182
Other Identifier(s):(MiAaPQ)AAI3198938
Date Available in IDEALS:2015-09-25
Date Deposited:2005


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