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Title:Effects of Social Category and Value Dissimilarity in Teams: The Role of Relational and Collective Identification
Author(s):Cooper, Danielle L.
Doctoral Committee Chair(s):Lorna Doucet
Department / Program:Business Administration
Discipline:Business Administration
Degree Granting Institution:University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree:Ph.D.
Genre:Dissertation
Subject(s):Business Administration, Management
Abstract:This dissertation draws from social identity theory and self-categorization theory to examine the relationship between team members' social category dissimilarity in their team in terms of nation and race/ethnic origin and their satisfaction and learning in a team. It is argued that these relations are moderated by value dissimilarity and individual team member identifications. Specifically, the study assessed how (a) collective identification with social category, (b) collective identification with the team and (c) relational identification with team members from different social categories moderated these relations. Finally, the study examined the influence of the three-way interactions among social category dissimilarity, value dissimilarity, and identification types on satisfaction and learning in a team. These hypotheses were tested using a survey of team members in thirty organizations. Results suggested that value dissimilarity moderated the relation between social category dissimilarity and learning. Race/ethnic origin dissimilarity more negatively influenced learning when value dissimilarity was high. Findings also indicated marginal support for the moderating role of value dissimilarity on the effect of social category dissimilarity on satisfaction. National dissimilarity more positively influenced satisfaction when value dissimilarity was high. Additionally, results supported the moderating role of relational identification with individuals from different social categories on the relation between social category dissimilarity and learning. This relation was more negative when relational identification was low that when it was high. Furthermore, the study found partial support for the hypothesized effect of three-way interaction among social category dissimilarity, value dissimilarity, and relational identification on learning. Race/ethnic origin dissimilarity most negatively affected learning in a team when relational identification was low and value dissimilarity was high. Finally, this study found marginal support for the moderating influence of collective identification with the team on the relation between social category dissimilarity and learning. Being different in social category from team members more negatively affected learning when collective identification with the team was low than when it was high. The implications of these findings for managing teams with dissimilar members are discussed.
Issue Date:2007
Type:Text
Language:English
Description:194 p.
Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2007.
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/84557
Other Identifier(s):(MiAaPQ)AAI3269867
Date Available in IDEALS:2015-09-25
Date Deposited:2007


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