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Title:The Effect of High Salt Intake on Betaine-Homocysteine S-Methyltransferase Expression in the Guinea Pig
Author(s):Delgado-Reyes, Cassandra Veronica
Doctoral Committee Chair(s):Garrow, Timothy A.
Department / Program:Nutritional Sciences
Discipline:Nutritional Sciences
Degree Granting Institution:University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree:Ph.D.
Genre:Dissertation
Subject(s):Chemistry, Biochemistry
Abstract:BHMT is the only enzyme known to metabolize betaine, leading to the hypothesis that BHMT is down-regulated under conditions requiring the accumulation of betaine, such as high salt intake. BHMT is expressed in the livers of mammals and only a few species such as pig, guinea pig, and primates (including humans) have been shown to express BHMT in the kidney. Immunodetection methods were used to demonstrate that humans and guinea pigs have similar patterns of hepatic and renal BHMT expression and suggest that the guinea pig is a suitable in vivo model for studying renal BHMT. Guinea pig, however, also demonstrated BHMT expression in the pancreas. To investigate the possible osmotic regulation of BHMT, guinea pigs were subjected to high salt intake and BHMT expression analyzed. BHMT activity in liver and kidney cortex decreased approximately 55%, but no change in pancreatic BHMT activity was observed. Neither a soluble effector nor an increase in ionic strength had an effect on BHMT activity. Choline dehydrogenase, the enzyme responsible for the committed step in de novo synthesis of betaine, showed no change in liver or kidney cortex activity with treatment. Western blot analysis indicated a 30% reduction in steady-state liver and kidney cortex BHMT protein. Real-time PCR using TagMan chemistry demonstrated a 93% reduction in steady-state liver BHMT mRNA and a 72% reduction in steady-state kidney cortex BHMT mRNA. The discrepancy in the reduction of BHMT activity, steady-state protein, and steady-state mRNA may suggest complex regulation of BHMT expression including variable turnover rates of protein and mRNA and post-translational modifications of the BHMT enzyme.
Issue Date:2003
Type:Text
Language:English
Description:117 p.
Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2003.
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/84933
Other Identifier(s):(MiAaPQ)AAI3111536
Date Available in IDEALS:2015-09-25
Date Deposited:2003


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