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Title:Conflict and Culture Change in the Late Prehistoric and Early Historic American Midcontinent
Author(s):Hollinger, R. Eric
Doctoral Committee Chair(s):Pauketat, Timothy R.
Department / Program:Anthropology
Discipline:Anthropology
Degree Granting Institution:University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree:Ph.D.
Genre:Dissertation
Subject(s):Anthropology, Archaeology
Abstract:Beginning in the early 1600s, populations were destabilized by the indirect effects of European contact. With new incentives and new weapons (i.e., firearms), old enemies took advantage of weaknesses brought on by disease and famine to wage wars of annihilation. Algonquian and Iroquoian tribes pushed westward, driving other tribes ahead of them or exterminating them completely. For the Oneota, large territories were abandoned for more defensive strategies, including new alliances with former enemies and amalgamation into multi-ethnic refugee settlements.
Issue Date:2005
Type:Text
Language:English
Description:412 p.
Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2005.
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/85268
Other Identifier(s):(MiAaPQ)AAI3199021
Date Available in IDEALS:2015-09-25
Date Deposited:2005


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