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Title:The Effects of Two Polychlorinated Biphenyl Mixtures on Honey Bee (Apis Mellifera) Foraging Behavior and Hypopharyngeal Gland Development
Author(s):Rosiak, Kimberly Lynne
Doctoral Committee Chair(s):Susan Fahrbach
Department / Program:Veterinary Clinical Medicine
Discipline:Veterinary Clinical Medicine
Degree Granting Institution:University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree:Ph.D.
Genre:Dissertation
Subject(s):Biology, Zoology
Abstract:The honey bee is a novel model in which to study physiological and behavioral changes that may have a hormonal influence. This dissertation focused on the effects of two PCB mixtures, Aroclor 1242 and 1254, on the European honey bee, Apis mellifera, as there is evidence that these compounds disrupt hormonal function in endocrine systems of mammals. After testing the dose range 0--80 mug/bee of A1242 and 0--1000 mug/bee of A1254, the LD20 for each PCB mixture was identified as 20 mug/bee and 100 mug/bee for A1242 and A1254, respectively. We then examined whether these doses affected the development of the hypopharyngeal gland and/or foraging behavior. Residue analysis was completed on bees exposed to the LD20 for each PCB mixture. In addition to being more toxic, A1242 was more quickly absorbed and excreted by the honey bee than A1254. Because honey bees appear to be more sensitive to A1242 than A1254, subsequent studies on the hypopharyngeal gland concentrated on A1242. Exposure of bees to 20 mug of A1242 produced an acceleration of age-related increases in alpha-glucosidase activity, acinar diameter, and wet weights of the hypopharyngeal gland when compared to controls. There was no evidence of precocious foraging following exposure to either A1242 or A1254. These studies provide new information on the behavioral and physiological effects of PCBs on honey bee populations. I conclude that exposure to sublethal doses of A1242 or A1254 is unlikely to impact U.S. bee populations.
Issue Date:2002
Type:Text
Language:English
Description:85 p.
Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2002.
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/87116
Other Identifier(s):(MiAaPQ)AAI3044212
Date Available in IDEALS:2015-09-28
Date Deposited:2002


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