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Note: This is a student project from a course affiliated with the Ethnography of the University Initiative. EUI supports faculty development of courses in which students conduct original research on their university, and encourages students to think about colleges and universities in relation to their communities and within larger national and global contexts.

Note: This is a student project from a course affiliated with the Ethnography of the University Initiative. EUI supports faculty development of courses in which students conduct original research on their university, and encourages students to think about colleges and universities in relation to their communities and within larger national and global contexts.

Note: This is a student project from a course affiliated with the Ethnography of the University Initiative. EUI supports faculty development of courses in which students conduct original research on their university, and encourages students to think about colleges and universities in relation to their communities and within larger national and global contexts.

An Analysis of the UIUC Ku Klux Klan and the Surrounding Debates

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Title: An Analysis of the UIUC Ku Klux Klan and the Surrounding Debates
Author(s): Lane, Stephan
Subject(s): Ku Klux Klan Prejudice KKK Archives Registered Student Organization RSO racism Segregation RHET104C S08
Abstract: Was the Ku Klux Klan at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign a racist organization? Was it affiliated with the well-known national Ku Klux Klan? Two archivists at UIUC claim that the group was not racist and had no affiliation with the nationwide KKK. These archivists, John Franch and Maynard Brichford, assert that the group's ideals and purpose were entirely social. This paper begins with a historical analysis of the student KKK from beginning to end. This first section is intended to provide the reader with the information needed to understand the debate described in the following two sections. Following the analysis, the arguments of the university archivists are examined and the involvement of the group's founder, Harold Pogue, is detailed. Since much information about the organization has been lost throughout the years, the truth about the group cannot be determined with complete certainty. The intent of my research is to point out a possibility that has not been addressed by university archivists; it is far more likely that the campus KKK is not as innocent as these experts have claimed.
Issue Date: 2008
Series/Report: Rhet 104, Ethnography of Race and the University, Instr. Samantha Looker: In this course, students take the writing skills that they built during Rhet 103 and apply them to research, with the ultimate goal of completing an in-depth research project. As part of the EUI-Rhetoric Race and the University Project, this class revolves around how race is represented and lived on university campuses, and specifically on our own campus here at UIUC. Students ground themselves in readings on how race is defined and talked about, and then move on to research related issues on our campus. Students will choose a research question related to race to answer in your final research project. As part of the EUI (Ethnography of the University Initiative), this class gives students the opportunity to create original scholarly research based on your firsthand experience with people, texts, and places on campus. In addition to traditional academic sources, students final research project will include several interviews, observations, surveys, and/or analyses of University texts.
Type: Text
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/8735
Publication Status: unpublished
Date Available in IDEALS: 2008-06-10
 

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Student Communities and Culture
    The university offers an extraordinary opportunity to study and document student communities, life, and culture. This collection includes research on the activities, clubs, and durable social networks that comprise sometimes the greater portion of the university experience for students.
  • Diversity on Campus/Equity and Access
    This collection examines ways in which the U.S. university and the American college experience are affected by diversity, and difference. In particular, these student projects examine experiences of diversity on campus, including important contemporary social, cultural, and political debates on equity and access to university resources.
  • University Units and Institutional Transformation
    Projects in this collection explore institutional growth and change as seen in the histories and practices of university units and programs.

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