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Title:Synthesis and supramolecular assembly of biomimetic polymers
Author(s):Marciel, Amanda B
Director of Research:Schroeder, Charles M.
Doctoral Committee Chair(s):Schroeder, Charles M.
Doctoral Committee Member(s):Lu, Yi; Zimmerman, Steven C.; Kilian, Kristopher A.
Department / Program:School of Molecular & Cell Bio
Discipline:Biophysics & Computnl Biology
Degree Granting Institution:University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree:Ph.D.
Genre:Dissertation
Subject(s):polymer chemistry
polymer physics
supramolecular assembly
single molecule
Abstract:A grand challenge in materials chemistry is the synthesis of macromolecules and polymers with precise shapes and architectures. Polymer microstructure and architecture strongly affect the resulting functionality of advanced materials, yet understanding the static and dynamic properties of these complex macromolecules in bulk has been difficult due to their inherit polydispersity. Single molecule studies have provided a wealth of information on linear flexible and semi-flexible polymers in dilute solutions. However, few investigations have focused on industrially relevant complex topologies (e.g., star, comb, hyperbranched polymers) in industrially relevant solution conditions (e.g., semi-dilute, concentrated). Therefore, from this perspective there is a strong need to synthesize precision complex architectures for bulk studies as well as complex architectures compatible with current single molecule techniques to study static and dynamic polymer properties. In this way, we developed a hybrid synthetic strategy to produce branched polymer architectures based on chemically modified DNA. Overall, this approach enables control of backbone length and flexibility, as well as branch grafting density and chemical identity. We utilized a two-step scheme based on enzymatic incorporation of non-natural nucleotides containing bioorthogonal dibenzocyclooctyne (DBCO) functional groups along the main polymer backbone, followed by copper-free “click” chemistry to graft synthetic polymer branches or oligonucleotide branches to the DNA backbone, thereby allowing for the synthesis of a variety of polymer architectures, including three-arm stars, H-polymers, graft block copolymers, and comb polymers for materials assembly and single molecule studies. Bulk materials properties are also affected by industrial processing conditions that alter polymer morphology. Therefore, in an alternative strategy we developed a microfluidic-based approach to assemble highly aligned synthetic oligopeptides nanostructures using microscale extensional flows. This strategy enabled reproducible, reliable fabrication of aligned hierarchical constructs that do not form spontaneously in solution. In this way, fluidic-directed assembly of supramolecular structures allows for unprecedented manipulation at the nano- and mesoscale, which has the potential to provide rapid and efficient control of functional materials properties.
Issue Date:2015-05-18
Type:Thesis
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/87944
Rights Information:Copyright 2015 Amanda Marciel
Date Available in IDEALS:2015-09-29
Date Deposited:August 201


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