Files in this item

FilesDescriptionFormat

application/pdf

application/pdfRAYMOND-THESIS-2015.pdf (10MB)
(no description provided)PDF

Description

Title:Re-evaluating Murakami's Superflat: toward a contextualized interpretation of contemporary Japanese art
Author(s):Raymond, Andrew Colin
Department / Program:E Asian Languages & Cultures
Discipline:Asian Studies
Degree Granting Institution:University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree:M.A.
Genre:Thesis
Subject(s):Murakami
Murakami Takashi
Superflat
Super Flat
Elliott
David Elliott
Little Boy
Bye Bye Kitty
Contemporary Japanese Art
Japanese Art
Aida
Aida Makoto
Ikeda
Ikeda Manabu
Nara
Nara Yoshitomo
Azuma
Azuma Hiroki
Sawaragi
Sawaragi Noi
Lyotard
Jean-François Lyotard
Orientalism
Postmodern Art
Danto
Arthur Danto
Japan Society
Curation
Anime
Manga
Favell
Adrian Favell
Kawaii
Neo pop
Neo-pop
Abstract:This thesis examines Murakami Takashi’s Superflat theory and exhibition as well as the ramifications of its success. Developed through the 1990s and the early 2000s, Murakami’s Superflat theory attempts to prove a direct connection between the aesthetics of Edo period (1603-1868) and contemporary Japanese art. Murakami built his own production studio and branding devices as an attempt to further codify Superflat as a unique movement in Japanese art. As a result of Murakami’s tactics and the popularity of his theory in North America and Europe, many of his contemporaries are frequently analyzed through the lens of Superflat. Yet, the totalizing effect of the Superflat theory does disservice to the majority of Japanese contemporary artists whose work has very little in relation to Murakami’s pop aesthetic. To explore how Murakami achieved this result, this thesis first analyzes the art historical claims made in the Superflat theory. This is followed by an examination of the impetus for and contextualization of the creation of Superflat. As an example of the effect of Murakami’s discursive dominance over conversations of Japanese art in North America, the thesis concludes with an analysis of David Elliott’s 2011 Japan Society exhibition titled "Bye Bye Kiity!!! Between Heaven and Hell in Japanese Contemporary Art." The thesis concludes with the assertion that we must fundamentally re-evaluate the ways in which Japanese art is represented, particularly within the United States.
Issue Date:2015-09-25
Type:Thesis
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/88947
Rights Information:Copyright 2015 A. Colin Raymond
Date Available in IDEALS:2016-03-02
Date Deposited:2015-12


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Item Statistics