Files in this item

FilesDescriptionFormat

application/pdf

application/pdfSAUCEDO-DISSERTATION-2016.pdf (1MB)Restricted Access
(no description provided)PDF

Description

Title:Endangered species: the hope for students in Mexican Chicago
Author(s):Saucedo, Miguel A
Director of Research:Pak, Yoon K
Doctoral Committee Chair(s):Pak, Yoon K
Doctoral Committee Member(s):Andersn, James D.; Lujo, Alejandro; Stovall, David O.
Department / Program:Educ Policy, Orgzn & Leadrshp
Discipline:Educational Policy Studies
Degree Granting Institution:University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree:Ph.D.
Genre:Dissertation
Subject(s):Education
Mexican Chicago
Abstract:This dissertation is an ethnographic study that documents the educational experiences of Mexican Boys and Men (MBM) in a predominately Mexican immigrant neighborhood in Chicago, Illinois. A Chicago Public High School (CPS) and the local community are "analyzed as an account in which young [Mexican American] males have had a history of criminalization and punitive social control" (Rios, 2011, p. 21). The primary research question examines: to what extent did the Zero Tolerance discipline policy in and out of Chicago Public Schools influence the MBM "dropout or pushout" crisis? The ethnography’s four methods of data collection were individual interviews, focus groups, participant observations, and review of documents for three research sites. Grounded in my positionality as a community "native/insider" (Villenas, 1996; Delgado, 1998), I audio-recorded the testimonies of twenty current and former male students from Tenorio High School (pseudonym) and from the "Si Se Puede" Church (pseudonym) in "México Town" (pseudonym) during the academic-year of 2012-2013. The findings demonstrated that Chicago’s key institutions have a long history of criminalizing Mexican Boys and Men via Zero Tolerance policies, which directly influences the “drop-out or push-out” problem at Tenorio High School in "México town." Moreover, the stories of young Mexican American male students complicates the master narrative of "the Latino threat" rhetoric that labels Mexican immigrants as "dropping out of school, becoming gang members, and causing problems" (Chavez, 2008, p. 38).
Issue Date:2016-04-22
Type:Thesis
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/90884
Rights Information:Copyright 2016 Miguel Angel Saucedo
Date Available in IDEALS:2016-07-07
Date Deposited:2016-05


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Item Statistics