Files in this item

FilesDescriptionFormat

application/pdf

application/pdfWENG-DISSERTATION-2016.pdf (11MB)Restricted Access
(no description provided)PDF

Description

Title:Irish modernism and the machine
Author(s):Weng, Julie McCormick
Director of Research:Mahaffey, Vicki
Doctoral Committee Chair(s):Mahaffey, Vicki
Doctoral Committee Member(s):Hansen, Jim; Gaedtke, Andrew; Conrad, Kathryn
Department / Program:English
Discipline:English
Degree Granting Institution:University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree:Ph.D.
Genre:Dissertation
Subject(s):Modernism
Machine
Literature
Ireland
Enlightenment
Electrification
Electricity
Technology
Industrialization
History of Science
History of Technology
Cosmopolitanism
Nationalism
Irish Literary Revival
Bicycle
Train
Tram
Railways
Dynamo
Power Generator
Body
Masculinity
Femininity
Sexuality
Gender
Gender Roles
Irish Literature
Irish Modernism
James Joyce
W. B. Yeats
John Eglinton
William Kirkpatrick Magee
Samuel Beckett
Elizabeth Bowen
E. M. Forster
H. G. Wells
Henry Adams
Eugene O'Neill
Filippo Tommaso Emilio Marinetti
Ulysses
Finnegans Wake
Molloy
Dublin
Ireland
Futurism
Epic
Materialism
Abstract:This dissertation argues that John Eglinton, James Joyce, Elizabeth Bowen, W.B. Yeats, and Samuel Beckett depict machines in texts in order to interrogate the status of Ireland's modernity. Are trains, dynamos (power generators), and bicycles signs of Ireland’s progress? Instead of an affirmation, I posit that Irish modernists issue a qualification, suggesting that Ireland’s technological development must be accompanied by ideological advancement. Irish modernists thus cast machines as vehicles that operate beyond the bounds of their mechanistic functions. These machines serve also as engines from which to lobby for Ireland’s social, cultural, and ideological progress. With this premise in mind, these writers use images of machines to: 1) envision a cosmopolitan national literary revival movement; 2) redress negative stereotypes of Ireland and Irish people as being "backwards"; 3) reject the post-enlightenment belief in a disenchanted, merely rational world; and 4) counter traditional gender and sexual roles. In all of these instances, Irish modernists endorse outlooks that go against traditional social and cultural grains. Rather, they insist that modernization is a process that necessitates ideological, and not just technological, advancement. Moreover, Irish modernists show that it is only by pushing the boundaries of popular beliefs and practices—and not just the limits of scientific knowledge—that Ireland will embrace a modern identity that engages meaningfully with the complexities of the age.
Issue Date:2016-04-18
Type:Thesis
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/90906
Rights Information:Copyright 2016 Julie McCormick Weng
Date Available in IDEALS:2016-07-07
Date Deposited:2016-05


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Item Statistics