Files in this item

FilesDescriptionFormat

application/pdf

application/pdfMILNER-THESIS-2016.pdf (3MB)Restricted Access
(no description provided)PDF

Description

Title:Water driven deformation in soft solids
Author(s):Milner, Matthew Paul
Department / Program:Mechanical Sci & Engineering
Discipline:Mechanical Engineering
Degree Granting Institution:University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree:M.S.
Genre:Thesis
Subject(s):creasing
elastomer
Abstract:Plants have utilized water to achieve many different types of motion, using the concepts that they use, we are able to develop a self-actuated soft solid-liquid composite. This self-actuation is driven by the evaporation and resulting tension of water, which can deform soft materials. The effects that water droplets deforming in soft solids have need to be characterized in order to utilize these composites. When water is embedded in elastomeric materials, it can undergo transitions known as breathing, buckling, and creasing. Breathing and creasing have been observed. These droplets are examined in elastomers of two different elastic modulus. When droplets in the stiffer elastomer crease they form just one crease, whereas less stiff elastomers crease in multiple areas, this is the result of the surface tension. Creasing is expected to set in for any embedded droplet when it shrinks to the same relative size ratio. However, there seems to be a dependence on the stiffness, stiffer samples crease at a smaller size. The pressure in the droplets appears to not reach the expected cavitation limit, which could be a result of not taking strain hardening effects into account in calculations. After studying how a single droplet deforms in an elastomer, multiple droplets are used together in order to achieve motion resulting from evaporation.
Issue Date:2016-04-28
Type:Thesis
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/90969
Rights Information:Copyright 2016 Matthew Milner
Date Available in IDEALS:2016-07-07
Date Deposited:2016-05


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Item Statistics