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Title:Method development for the characterization of intrinsic and extant kinetic parameters in microalgal cultures
Author(s):Lardizabal, Amanda
Advisor(s):Guest, Jeremy
Department / Program:Civil & Environmental Eng
Discipline:Environ Engr in Civil Engr
Degree Granting Institution:University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree:M.S.
Genre:Thesis
Subject(s):Modeling
Calibration
Batch
Photosynthesis
Protein synthesis inhibition
Abstract:Algal bioprocesses for wastewater treatment have the potential to simultaneously recover nitrogen and phosphorous while also producing feedstocks for bioenergy and bioproducts. In order to develop reliable treatment processes for water resource recovery facilities, however, it is critical that we have robust, mechanistic models of phototrophic bioprocesses to predict performance under varying environmental conditions (light intensity, nutrient concentration, etc.). As we seek to develop such models, we must also have reliable approaches to calibrate and validate key parameters that govern model accuracy. The objectives of this research are to develop an experimental apparatus and methodology to characterize intrinsic and extant kinetic parameters in phototrophic cultures. Intrinsic kinetic parameters – used in model calibration – represent the maximum kinetic potential of the culture. Extant kinetic parameters – used in model validation – are representative of the existing fitness and performance of the biomass in the bioreactor. A temperature-controlled system with ten independent light chambers was designed and fabricated to enable kinetic experiments with four replicate vials within each chamber, with lighting intensity in each chamber independently controlled. The apparatus was demonstrated to enable characterization of growth rate, nitrogen uptake, and phosphorus uptake. Quantification of these parameters will help to identify, characterize, and validate mechanistic links between process design, environmental conditions, nutrient recovery, and community function.
Issue Date:2016-07-22
Type:Thesis
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/92880
Rights Information:Copyright 2016 Amanda Lardizabal
Date Available in IDEALS:2016-11-10
Date Deposited:2016-08


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