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Title:A hybrid approach to reflection: an investigation of blogs and in-person meetings used to support pre-service teachers’ reflective practices
Author(s):Abbott, Valerie J
Advisor(s):Sadler, Randall
Contributor(s):O'Reilly, Erin
Department / Program:Linguistics
Discipline:Teaching English as a Second Language
Degree Granting Institution:University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree:M.A.
Genre:Thesis
Subject(s):collaborative reflection
teacher training
hybrid reflection models
Abstract:This study investigated the implementation of a hybrid collaborative reflection model that used a blog and in-person meetings for a teacher assistant (TA) training program at the Intensive English Program (IEP) associated with a Midwestern university. The IEP’s Director added the collaborative reflection experience to extend the TA training program into a semester-long support system. To gain insights on the effectiveness of the reflection experience, the researcher focused on three main themes: reflective teaching practices, using technology for reflection, and learning communities. The participants included five TAs who were in their first semester of teaching at the IEP and the IEP’s Director. For this ethnographic study, data collection was conducted in the semester the training occurred and in the subsequent semester. Data included field observations, surveys, interviews, blog content, and meeting transcriptions. The findings showed mostly positive perceptions of the collaborative reflection and the related development of a learning community. This study suggested that the collaborative reflection experience can be improved by clarifying the concept and benefits of reflection and training TAs on the technology used for reflection. Levels of engagement varied across the participants, but the TAs felt the four reflection topics added value to the TA training process.
Issue Date:2016-12-08
Type:Thesis
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/95412
Rights Information:Copyright 2016 Valerie Abbott
Date Available in IDEALS:2017-03-01
Date Deposited:2016-12


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