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Title:A CHIRAL TAGGING STRATEGY FOR DETERMINING ABSOLUTE CONFIGURATION AND ENANTIOMERIC EXCESS BY MOLECULAR ROTATIONAL SPECTROSCOPY
Author(s):Pate, Brooks
Contributor(s):West, Channing; Xu, Yunjie; Thomas, Javix; Patterson, David; Caminati, Walther; Evangelisti, Luca
Subject(s):Mini-symposium: Chirality-Sensitive Spectroscopy
Abstract:The introduction of three wave mixing rotational spectroscopy by Patterson, Schnell, and Doyle [1,2] has expanded applications of molecular rotational spectroscopy into the field of chiral analysis. Chiral analysis of a molecule is the quantitative measurement of the relative abundances of all stereoisomers of the molecule and these include both diastereomers (with distinct molecular rotational spectra) and enantiomers (with equivalent molecular rotational spectra). This work adapts a common strategy in chiral analysis of enantiomers to molecular rotational spectroscopy. A “chiral tag” is attached to the molecule of interest by making a weakly bound complex in a pulsed jet expansion. When this tag molecule is enantiopure, it will create diastereomeric complexes with the two enantiomers of the molecule being analyzed and these can be differentiated by molecule rotational spectroscopy. Identifying the structure of this complex, with knowledge of the absolute configuration of the tag, establishes the absolute configuration of the molecule of interest. Furthermore, the diastereomer complex spectra can be used to determine the enantiomeric excess of the sample. The ability to perform chiral analysis will be illustrated by a study of solketal using propylene oxide as the tag. The possibility of using current methods of quantum chemistry to assign a specific structure to the chiral tag complex will be discussed. Finally, chiral tag rotational spectroscopy offers a “gold standard” method for determining the absolute configuration of the molecule through determination of the substitution structure of the complex. When this measurement is possible, rotational spectroscopy can deliver a quantitative three dimensional structure of the molecule with correct stereochemistry as the analysis output._x000d_ _x000d_ [1] David Patterson, Melanie Schnell, John M. Doyle, Nature 497, 475 (2013)._x000d_ [2] David Patterson, John M. Doyle, Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 023008 (2013). _x000d_
Issue Date:6/22/2017
Publisher:International Symposium on Molecular Spectroscopy
Citation Info:APS
Genre:CONFERENCE PAPER/PRESENTATION
Type:Text
Language:English
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/97112
DOI:10.15278/isms.2017.RG03
Date Available in IDEALS:2017-07-27


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