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Title:Acute metabolic response to functional electrical stimulation cycling in people with MS with severe mobility impairments
Author(s):Edwards, Thomas Adam
Advisor(s):Pilutti, Lara A
Department / Program:Kinesiology & Community Health
Discipline:Kinesiology
Degree Granting Institution:University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree:M.S.
Genre:Thesis
Subject(s):Multiple sclerosis
Exercise
Metabolism
Abstract:Persons with multiple sclerosis (MS) with severe mobility impairment have low levels of cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF). Exercise training is one strategy for improving CRF, however there are limited modalities for safely and effectively increasing CRF in individuals with MS with severe disability. In this thesis a systematic review of literature pertaining to exercise training and individuals with MS with severe disability was conducted. This review evaluated the effectiveness of said interventions for improving physical fitness and improving physical function. After this systematic review, a cross sectional analysis was done in order to characterize the acute metabolic demand associated with functional electrical stimulation (FES) cycling. Eleven participants with MS that required assistance for ambulation completed a session of either FES cycling or passive leg cycling. Oxygen consumption (VO2), heart rate (HR), and work rate (WR) were recorded during the session. It was determined that FES cycling elicited had acute metabolic demand that corresponded with moderate-to-vigorous exercise intensity and this response was significantly more intense than passive leg cycling alone. This suggests that FES cycling can elicit a sufficient cardiorespiratory stimulus for improving CRF in people with severe MS.
Issue Date:2017-04-18
Type:Thesis
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/97359
Rights Information:Copyright 2017 Thomas Edwards
Date Available in IDEALS:2017-08-10
Date Deposited:2017-05


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