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Title:Spectroscopic characterization of molecular and atomic iodine
Author(s):Evans, Jesse D
Advisor(s):Glumac, Nick
Department / Program:Mechanical Sci & Engineering
Discipline:Mechanical Engineering
Degree Granting Institution:University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree:M.S.
Genre:Thesis
Subject(s):aluminum and iodine pentoxide
iodine
absorption spectroscopy
biocidals
halogenated thermites
Abstract:This research looks to characterize molecular and atomic iodine to benefit to the ability of molecular iodine to act as a biocidal agent. There is much literature on the topic of iodine as a bacterial suppressant and the effectiveness of various mixtures. However, there is little research available that studies the temporal variation of iodine after it has been produced from a combustion system and how such a system can be studied. In particular, this investigation probes the temperature dependence of four different molecular iodine spectral band heads at 588, 615, 631, and 636 nanometers as a means to isolate one or more band heads with limited temperature dependence. This would provide effective means for looking at concentration variation, and it would present a novel method for doing so on the 636 nm band head through use of two diode lasers. It also analyzes the effect on iodine production in the aluminum and iodine pentoxide system when the environment, combustion mixture, and ignition source are varied. Finally, it investigates the temperature and concentration dependence of the 1314.9 nm atomic iodine line and the temporal concentration variation of atomic iodine in an aluminum, potassium perchlorate, and iodine crystal combustion system, which is important because at higher temperatures molecular iodine will dissociate into atomic iodine. This effect may have drastic consequences on the amount and potency of the produced iodine.
Issue Date:2017-04-27
Type:Thesis
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/97629
Rights Information:Copyright 2017 Jesse Evans
Date Available in IDEALS:2017-08-10
Date Deposited:2017-05


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