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Title:An examination of affective change in the absence of physical sensation
Author(s):Rougeau, Kathryn M
Director of Research:Petruzzello, Steven J
Doctoral Committee Chair(s):Petruzzello, Steven J
Doctoral Committee Member(s):Elliott, Jeannette; Rice, Ian M; Jan, Yih-Kuen
Department / Program:Kinesiology & Community Health
Discipline:Kinesiology
Degree Granting Institution:University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree:Ph.D.
Genre:Dissertation
Subject(s):passive exercise, placebo, affect, spinal cord injury
Abstract:In the examination of affective responses to acute aerobic exercise, researchers have struggled to find an appropriate control condition to use in comparison with aerobic exercise, as a true placebo has evaded the field. This has resulted in a variety of conditions constituting “control” in the literature (quiet rest, reading, sitting in a chair on a treadmill, stretching, etc.). One option that holds merit but has yet to be tested is that of passive cycling in spinal cord injured individuals. As such the purpose of the present study was to examine the psychological and physiological effects of Passive versus Placebo cycling. A total of 21 (10 females) participated in a Rest session, Passive cycling session (the ergometer pedals were moved by a motor while their feet were attached), and Placebo cycling session (the motor was on, running, but disengaged while their feet were attached). Passive cycling elicited psychological changes that varied significantly with respect to perceptions of Energy and Calmness, but not valenced (i.e., positive, negative) affect. The Passive condition had no significant effects on physiological factors such as HR or Temperature Participants reported more enjoyment following the Passive condition compared to Rest and Placebo conditions. Rating of Perceived Exertion was significantly higher during the Passive condition compared to both Rest and Placebo. There may be some merit in future research studying affective responses throughout and following exercise in individuals with disabilities.
Issue Date:2017-07-13
Type:Thesis
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/98287
Rights Information:Copyright 2017 Kathryn Rougeau
Date Available in IDEALS:2017-09-29
Date Deposited:2017-08


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